An unfair trans juggernaut in high school athletics

Thursday, February 28, 2019
 | 
Bob Kellogg (OneNewsNow.com)

Transgender athlete Terry MillerTwo high school athletes in Connecticut – both of whom are transitioning from biological males to females – are creating a lot of controversy by competing against biological females in track events.

Andraya Yearwood, a 17-year-old biological male sprinter from Cromwell High, recently finished second in the girls' 55-meter dash at the state open indoor track championships. Bloomfield High's Terry Miller (pictured), the winner and also a transgender, set a state record. The two also finished 1-2 last year going head-to-head in two events at the state finals.

Steve McConkey of 4 Winds Christian Athletics says Miller and Yearwood had an unfair advantage.

"The Olympics make you go through a year of hormone therapy [before you can compete as a transgender]," he explains. "[But] in high school, there's no hormone therapy, no sex reassignment – nothing. All they gotta do is show up on the door and say they want to compete as a girl."

According to Transathlete.com, 22 states either have no policy or handle the transgender issue on a case-by-case basis at the high school level; nine require either a birth certificate or surgery and hormone waiting period. But Connecticut is one of 19 states that allow transgender males to compete against biological females without restrictions.

McConkey notes that upset and frustrated parents in Connecticut have been unable to stop the unfair competition in their state.

"This is the LGBT agenda getting into high schools and telling people what they have to believe," he tells OneNewsNow. "And they try to silence the people – there was a petition by parents to try to stop this, but obviously they're [running into] a brick wall."

The Connecticut's Interscholastic Athletic Conference says it follows state law which says students must be treated by the gender with which they identify, according to Fox News.

Comments

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details