Christ sustains Cullen through ups, downs of NHL career

Friday, March 17, 2017
 | 
Bill Bumpas (OneNewsNow.com)

Matt Cullen (NHL's Pittsburgh Penguins)As the NHL regular season is in its final weeks with the Stanley Cup playoffs on the horizon, a 20-year veteran and out-spoken Christian is eyeing another championship before the sun sets on his career.

Forty-year-old Matt Cullen is a two-time Stanley Cup champion – first with the Carolina Hurricanes in 2006, and last year with the Pittsburgh Penguins. Now he and the Penguins are in search for what would be a second consecutive title for the franchise. The Fellowship of Christian Athletes highlights Cullen and his faith in the current edition of FCA Magazine.

"Hockey is such an up-and-down sport," he writes in an article for the magazine. "One day you're on top of the world, and the next you're down in the dumps. My faith helps put things in the right frame of mind where I keep my eye on what's truly important ...."

FCAMagazine editor Clay Meyer says the hockey star uses the game as a platform to share his beliefs.

"[He shared with] me that he's proud of the fact that he can be known as a Christian in the game of hockey," Meyer tells OneNewsNow. "And Matt was very vocal in just being able to say that he's now in this leadership position as a veteran in the league and excited to be able to share his faith with the younger players, and specifically in the Penguins' locker room."

According to Meyer, Cullen – after spending half his life in the NHL – is trusting that will sustain him as he transitions to the next stage of his life. "He said that his faith really is what gives him some assurance that life after hockey is going to be okay," says the journalist.

And life after hockey for Cullen and his family includes staying active in their church and partnering with FCA's hockey ministry.

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