Doc's advice: Get the vaccine to stop 'nasty' virus

Monday, January 4, 2021
 | 
Chris Woodward, Billy Davis (OneNewsNow.com)

COVID vaccine shotDoctors and other health experts continue to recommend people get a COVID-19 vaccine despite some concerns from the medical community itself.

"Anticipating that you're going to catch COVID is probably a pretty good guess at this point," Amy Givler, a family physician in Monroe, Louisiana tells One News Now. "The vaccine is the way to avoid COVID."

Some vaccines available now while others are expected in the U.S. early next year.

Around the country, a Los Angeles nurse was one of the first medical workers in the country to receive the second dose of a Pfizer vaccine, CNN reported.

“Having the vaccine is offering just a little more hope and that extra assurance that we’re a little more protected,” Helen Cordova, an intensive care unit nurse, told reporters.

In hard-hit New York City, the city’s goal is for all first responders and school staff to receive the vaccine in the next few weeks, Mayor Bill De Blasio announced.

NPR reported in a Jan. 1 story, however, that a third of medical workers insist they will refuse the vaccination. The story cited a survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Many of those concerns likely come from cultural concerns from blacks and Hispanics, and their distrust of the government, Dr. Nikhila Juvvadi, a chief clinical officer for a Chicago hospital, told NPR. 

Juvvadi said it is important for herself and others to listen to the concerns and to not dismiss them, and be ready with answers to questions about the vaccine. 

"It is my personal opinion that if you have not have COVID yet, and you choose not to get a vaccine, then you are looking at getting COVID," says Givler, a participate in the Pfizer vaccine trials. "It's that infectious."

The family physician points out the virus recently took the life of Luke Letlow, a congressman-elect who died of a heart attack while undergoing a procedure related to COVID-19. He was only 41 and had no underlying health problems. 

"It's a nasty bug," says Givler.

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