Technology can't replace doc at bedside

Tuesday, March 26, 2019
 | 
Charlie Butts (OneNewsNow.com)

elderly patientTechnology has a rightful place in medicine but it cannot and should not replace the heart of a caring doctor, says a longtime physician.

One saddening case in point is Ernest Quintana, who was suffering from a chronic lung disease when he was rushed to a California hospital. It was there that he learned hospice was the next step from a doctor live-streaming from a remote care robot.

According to the story from Live Action, Quintana is hard of hearing and the robot could not go to the other side of the bed so he could hear. So his daughter, Catherine Quintana, had to relay the news.

To relay “normal news” to a patient is one thing, she later told the media, “but if you’re coming to tell us there’s no lung left and we want to put you on a morphine drip until you die, it should be done by a human being and not a machine.”

hospital surgeryAsked for a response to that incident, Dr. David Stevens of the Christian Medical & Dental Association tells OneNewsNow that medicine cannot be done “by proxy” with bad news conveyed via a video screen.

“Robots don't have empathy. Robots don't have compassion. Robots don't touch,” he says. “That's where the real caring part of medicine is and that's what people value more than anything else.”

Stevens says there is a place for robotic technology, such as the da Vinci surgical system that helps surgeons make precise incisions by reacting to their hand movements.

But when people are suffering, he adds, there needs to be a doctor at the bedside.

Consider Supporting Us?

The staff at Onenewsnow.com strives daily to bring you news from a biblical perspective. If you benefit from this platform and want others to know about it please consider a generous gift today.

MAKE A DONATION

Comments

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWSBRIEF

SUBSCRIBE

VOTE IN OUR POLL

What does Pinterest's banning of a pro-life group tell you about that social media platform?

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

Iran speeds up uranium enrichment as Mideast tensions mount
2 shot, 2 arrested at Raptors rally; celebration continues
Buttigieg goes home to South Bend after man killed by police
Report: Childhood poverty persists in fast-growing Southwest
Blackout in South America raises questions about power grid
High court avoids new case over same-sex wedding case
Masked gunman opens fire on Dallas courthouse, then dies
Mexico to target human smugglers in immigration crackdown

LATEST FROM THE WEB

Clarence Thomas calls for abandoning 'demonstrably erroneous' precedent, touching off 'Roe v. Wade' speculation
Poll: O'Rourke, Warren, and Sanders trail Biden in tight Texas primary
Amazon publicly roasts Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez after she blasts Jeff Bezos' wealth, Amazon wages
Christians a highly visible presence in Hong Kong protests
LifeWay camp staffer charged with child molestation

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day
NEXT STORY
Some DNA-testing firms are in cahoots with the feds

DNA strandIt's a growing industry, with radio, television, and print ads to boot – but do you know where your DNA might be going after signing on with one of those genealogy companies?