Is California taking things too far … or not far enough?

Monday, September 17, 2018
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

electrical power plantWhat some view as a trendsetter, others deem kooky.

California has set a goal of phasing out electricity produced by fossil fuels by 2045 under legislation signed this month by Governor Jerry Brown (D). The signing ceremony preceded a climate summit Brown was hosting in San Francisco. He believes man-made climate change is real, it is bad, and it is going to get worse if mankind does not reduce its dependency on fossil fuels.

Kathryn Phillips, director of the Sierra Club's California chapter, hopes it will serve as an example beyond the state's borders. "People watch what we do, and they adopt policies that are the same or similar to what we are adopting," she said in remarks printed on SierraClub.org.

"It's crazy that they do these things," says H. Sterling Burnett, Ph.D. of the Illinois-based Heartland Institute. "They should set the standard, saying, 'Here's how much energy we need' and then tell the utilities, 'Find the cheapest way of providing this energy for our people,' [because] that's what is good for businesses, and that's what's good for residents."

Burnett

Pointing to The Golden State's television ads urging people to "come to California," Burnett says these actions by Governor Brown and other lawmakers are actually driving people out of California.

"I honestly don't know what they're going to do when they have nobody that can afford their energy bills or their houses so they won't have teachers or police offices," he continues. "All they'll have is the wealthy who wonder why they can't get their lawns mowed or their kids don't have teachers at school. No one can afford to live there but the rich."

Business groups are not happy with the goal, saying it sets impossible targets that may drive up already high electricity prices -- something Burnett says is harmful to the poor.

Meanwhile, the Associated Press reports some environmental groups want Brown to take things one step further and ban new drilling permits.

Comments

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

FEATURED PODCAST

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWSBRIEF

SUBSCRIBE

VOTE IN OUR POLL

How likely is it Texas will go 'blue' in November 2020 presidential election?

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

  Israel's Netanyahu charged in corruption cases
Democrats spar at debate over health care, how to beat Trump
Survey: About 1 in 4 Europeans hold anti-Semitic beliefs
Gore kicking off 24 hours of climate talks around the world
Victims’ lawyer: Prince Andrew must talk to U.S. prosecutors
China bats away rumors, says trade talks with U.S. continue

LATEST FROM THE WEB

'Kunta Kinte' T-shirt fits Kaepernick perfectly
Two Iowa race incidents prove common sense is scarce
Other people’s money
Chick-fil-A’s shameful capitulation
We'll tell you who's privileged

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day
NEXT STORY
30 yrs. later, global warming still hasn't sunk Maldives

global warmingAfter alerting the world in September 1988 that the Maldive islands of the Indian Ocean would be submerged by rising seas in less than three decades – due to the so-called first effects of man-made global warming – officials of the United Nations and associated climatologists are scratching their heads that the island chain is still there.