When your DNA research pokes holes in Darwin

Thursday, May 31, 2018
 | 
Billy Davis, Steve Jordahl (OneNewsNow.com)

DNA strandResearchers are announcing they have made a game-changing discovery in evolutionary biology and it could bring science one step closer to biblical truth.

According to the researchers, an American and a Swiss scientist, their study of DNA suggests that 100,000 animals first appeared at roughly the same time – not gradually over millions of year.

Likely realizing how that damages the evolutionary model, one of the scientists publicly stated they were hesitant to release their findings.

"There's a great danger to the evolutionary model in this study in ways they don't quite realize yet," comments Dr. Nathaniel Jeanson, a research biologist for Answers in Genesis.

Jeanson, who holds a PhD in cell development from Harvard, tells OneNewsNow that it's true the researchers concluded that animals and humans arrived on earth at roughly the same time. The same study, he says, also found there is no cross-over species.

A robin may evolve into a better robin, for example, but it didn't become a lizard.

The researchers aren't admitting that Genesis 1:1 is true, of course, and the May 28 story headline describes "new facets of evolution" in a study published in a journal entitled Human Evolution

But the story describes the "startling result" that nine out of 10 species on earth today, including humans, "came into being" 100,000 to 200,000 years ago. 

Evolutionary treeThat date line may not win over so-called "Young Earth" adherrents, who use Genesis to date the earth to about 10,000 years old, but the researchers said the findings left them baffled due to evolutionary models dating back millions of years. 

Another researcher quoted in the story surmised that, perhaps, many animal species suddenly died out from an "environmental trauma" such as a virus or an ice age. But the story pointed out that the theory of a mass extinction from an asteroid strike is 65.5 million years ago, still leaving a lengthy gap. 

"The conclusion is very surprising," one of the researchers said, "and I fought against it as hard as I could." 

Abe Hamilton, general counsel for the American Family Association, tells OneNewsNow that the study shows Christians don't have to "check their brains at the door" when they trust scripture, including the Genesis account of creation.


Editor's Note: The American Family Association is the parent organization of American Family News Network, which operates OneNewsNow.com. 

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