The truth about GMOs

Monday, April 24, 2017
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

farmer plowingAre concerns about Monsanto legitimate, or just a cleverly prepared media stunt? One expert believes it’s the latter.

This month, a tribunal brought together by a rights group that aims to highlight what it claims are abuses by the U.S. seed company Monsanto delivered an advisory opinion alleging that the company "engaged in practices which have negatively impacted" people's rights to a healthy environment, food, and good health.

In its findings, the Monsanto Tribunal says Monsanto has affected the livelihood and health of farmers and others around the world with its sales of genetically modified seeds and the weed-killer Roundup.

"I think it's a really cleverly prepared media stunt," responds Angela Logomasini, a senior fellow specializing in environmental risk and regulation for the Competitive Enterprise Institute. "I don't think it's based in science."

Logomasini

She adds this is certainly not anything official.

"This is an activist-organized conference that they're calling a tribunal because they had some judges there, and they're trying to allege some things that they have no evidence for," she says. "In fact, I'd argue that creating these seeds is what we need to feed people, and what they're doing is actually more of a crime than what they're accusing Monsanto of doing."

Individuals and organizations, not all of them liberal, have expressed concerns about pesticides and genetically modified foods. They argue that, among other things, pesticides and genetically modified foods are not good for our bodies.

"GMOs are no more risky than anything else," submits Logomasini. "We've been breeding plants and modifying them for a millennia. That's how food is made."

Logomasini believes this tribunal is more concerned about big business, and Monsanto has become the poster child.

"It's an easy target, so they can get lots of headlines," she explains. "It really has nothing to do with the food, the technology. I think it's more of an ideology that doesn't like big business. They're going after the big guys, and science is not the issue." 

Broadly speaking, Logomasi says these technologies are needed, whether they come from Monsanto or some other company.

"It may sound scary, but if we are going to feed people around the world, we need technologies that make it easier to grow food, to make it more affordable so that poor people can actually eat," she continues. "These groups can sit around comfortably in their coffeehouses in the western nations with all the food that they have and complain, but people around the world need affordable, healthy food."

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