Spreading the wealth to increase the poor

Tuesday, February 21, 2017
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

hot temperaturesAl Gore may beg to differ, but his plans to save the planet from a cataclysmic environmental disaster will cause more harm than good. 

The former U.S. vice president appeared in Atlanta last week, where he called on scientists and health officials to address what he called a "climate crisis on health."

According to Gore, who is now considered a guru of the environmental movement, the effects of climate change are falling hardest on the poor, and many diseases are made worse by a changing climate.

"Every adverse condition in the world falls hardest on the poor," observes Marlo Lewis of the Competitive Enterprise Institute.

Al Gore on climate changeThat's another way of stating, he says, that poverty has always been the cause of preventable disease and premature deaths.

"Therefore whatever you may want to do about climate change," Lewis advises, "you should always make sure that your policy doesn't make people poorer or hold back progress in eradicating poverty."

If it does, then Lewis says you are likely doing more harm than good.

Gore, meanwhile, has accumulated a net worth of $200 million and his 20-room, 5,000-square-foot Tennessee mansion made headlines years ago before he scrambled to lower its so-called "carbon footprint." 

One example of causing pain is the Paris climate agreement according to Cal Beisner of the Cornwall Alliance for the Stewardship of Creation.

Approximately 200 countries, including the United States, signed the agreement last year to pledge to reduce carbon emissions.  

It makes no sense for the U.S. or any other developed nation to remain in the agreement, Beisner told the "Sandy Rios in the Morning" show on American Family Radio.

"Unless, of course, you're one of those developing nations that recognizes that what the agreement is really all about it is not controlling global temperature but rather redistributing wealth from the developed world to the developing world," Beisner warned.

Lewis tells OneNewsNow that it's almost impossible to show that a particular health problem or illness is due to climate change, and numbers or estimates from the World Health Organization are a "drop in the bucket" compared to other, very measurable health consequences, he says.

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