Group harassed by cops takes Ore. city to court

Monday, March 30, 2020
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

lawsuit gavel with moneyAn organization that seeks to abolish abortion outright is suing the City of Grants Pass, Oregon, in federal court.

Ray Hacke is an attorney with Pacific Justice Institute, the law firm representing Abolish Abortion Oregon. "Two lawsuits were filed on behalf of [AAOR], which is a loose-knit group of Christians from throughout the state who travel around the state to call for the abolition of abortion," Hacke explains. 

According to the Oregon-based attorney, Abolish Abortion Oregon conveys its message through various methods, including open-air preaching, passing out tracts, initiating civil conversations, and displaying pro-life signs. He adds that the group often preaches its message on public sidewalks near abortion providers' places of business, including a Planned Parenthood facility in Grants Pass, as well as other public places.

Hacke

"Pretty much every time they show up there, the police show up to try to shut them down," says Hacke. "If they're using amplification, the police tell them they can't use amplification; and if they're not using amplification, the police tell them they're still being too loud."

In one case, according to Hacke, a 14-year-old boy who was sitting in a lawn chair and holding a sign was cited for obstructing traffic. "There was another incident where one of the members was cited for disorderly conduct," Hacke adds.

"... Both of those cases were dismissed; they weren't even prosecuted,” he notes, “but still, every time they show up the police try to do something to silence them."

Hacke adds that that’s the treatment the group gets not just at the Planned Parenthood facility, but also at festivals and other events.

"County fair authorities set up a free-speech area and limited people there. They couldn't use amplification, they couldn't hold signs, they put restrictions on them that they did not put on the vendors at the fair," the attorney describes. "So, basically it was a content- and speaker-based restriction … and so it kind of infringed on their constitutional right.

"I understand their message might not be popular … but that doesn't mean that police can come shut them down," Hacke concludes. "They are peaceful and have the right to speak freely."

OneNewsNow is seeking comment from the City of Grants Pass.

Comments

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

FEATURED PODCAST

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWSBRIEF

SUBSCRIBE

VOTE IN OUR POLL

Do you agree the virus pandemic has impacted our constitutional rights?

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

Memorial Day weekend draws crowds and triggers warnings
Slowly, surely, US houses of worship emerge from lockdown
White House imposes coronavirus travel ban on Brazil
Israel’s Netanyahu attacks justice system as trial begins
Desperate Indian girl bikes 745 miles home with disabled dad
Hong Kong police fire tear gas, water cannon at protesters
Taliban, Ghani declare three-day cease fire for Eid holiday

LATEST FROM THE WEB

Sen. Rick Scott: Bill of Rights allows Americans to worship at church service, no matter what gov't leaders say
Will Trump order sanctions on China's president for Hong Kong crackdown?
Beto O’Rourke mocks Texas governor’s reopening message – then hears back from Crenshaw, Cruz
Opinion — Newt Gingrich: On Memorial Day, we have a duty to honor Americans who died defending our country
Trump to attend Wednesday's NASA astronaut launch in Florida

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day
NEXT STORY
Pro-lifers watching closely after 'telemed' announcement

Planned Parenthood logo blackPennsylvania’s governor announced over the weekend that licensed medical professionals can provide services via telemedicine during the coronavirus outbreak, but that allowance has some pro-lifers concerned.