Pro-life activist upbeat over 'heartbeat' drumbeat

Friday, May 31, 2019
 | 
Charlie Butts, Jody Brown (OneNewsNow.com)

hand with ultrasound wandPointing to an encouraging string of state laws placing restrictions on abortions, the national author of the "heartbeat bill" believes the U.S. Supreme Court will eventually overturn Roe v. Wade.

Last night, Louisiana's Democratic governor – Gov. John Bel Edwards – made his state the fifth state to enact legislation that bans an abortion if the unborn child's heartbeat can be detected. The Bayou State joins Mississippi, Kentucky, Ohio, and Georgia as states that have recently signed a heartbeat bill into law.

Janet Porter of Faith2Action tells OneNewsNow that her Ohio headquarters plans to host a celebration of passage of all heartbeat bills.

heartbeat monitor"There has been a tipping point; there has a shift for life," says Porter. "We're going to celebrate Louisiana's victory as well as the victories this year we celebrated in Mississippi, Kentucky, Ohio, Georgia, Missouri, and – now – Louisiana. Praise be to the name of Jesus, the author and giver of life."

Last week, Missouri Governor Mike Parson (R) signed a bill banning abortions on or beyond the eighth week of pregnancy.

But this week the U.S. Supreme Court only got it "half right," says one pro-life spokeswoman, when it upheld an Indiana law requiring abortion providers to treat the remains of aborted babies like other humans – but sided with a lower court that ruled against the state's ban on abortions based on sex, race, and disabilities. Porter refuses to be discouraged by that.

"The Bible says even an unjust judge will give us the justice we seek," she responds, "and I believe that's going to happen. And [I believe] by the time the heartbeat bills deliver that arrow to the heart of Roe v. Wade, we may have some new justices on the [Supreme] Court as well.

"Either way we're going to keep going so that hearts can keep beating – and I believe we're going to win, and win soon."

However, several of the heartbeat bills are facing legal challenges since being signed into law.

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