Has governor's overreach gone too far?

Wednesday, November 18, 2020
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

Gov. Whitmer in maskSome legislators in Michigan may be discussing plans to impeach Governor Gretchen Whitmer.

The Democrat governor has made headlines this year for her strict response to COVID-19. In April, for example, she would not allow people in the Wolverine State to purchase garden seeds or paint. Then in May, she came under fire after her husband contacted a boat company near their summer home and asked for his boat to be put in the water for the coming Memorial Day weekend. The governor had urged Michiganders to think "long and hard" about traveling due to the virus.

More recently, Whitmer warned of her authority to issue a second stay-at-home order to curb the spike in cases and said it was "incredibly reckless" for President Donald Trump's science adviser Scott Atlas to urge people to "rise up" against Michigan's latest restrictions.

Over the weekend, Whitmer announced that Michigan high schools and colleges must halt in-person classes, restaurants must stop indoor dining, and entertainment businesses must close for three weeks. Gathering sizes also will be tightened.

Michigan-based Breitbart writer Kyle Olson recently relayed to the "Sandy Rios in the Morning" program that several legislators in the House want to file articles of impeachment, though whether they will pursue that in December or if they would wait until the new legislative session in January remains to be seen.

"In January, Republicans will have a 58 to 52 majority in the House of Representatives," Olson continued. "They need a simple majority to pass articles."

If approved, it would go to the Senate, where, just like with the federal government, members of the Michigan House would act as the prosecutors.

Olson

"Then it would require a two-thirds vote in the Senate," Olson explained. "There's 38 state senators in Michigan, and it's currently 22-16 Republicans, so they would need four of those 16 Democrats to cross party lines and vote to convict."

That, said Olson, is "probably a tall order."

"But I think what would happen in that impeachment process is it would be subpoena power," he offered. "There would be testimony; they would be able to get through … a lot of these issues that have been really outraging a lot of Michiganders for the last six-plus months."

Some of the issues include Governor Whitmer's restrictions on indoor and outdoor gatherings that she says are meant to combat the spread of COVID-19. Critics maintain Whitmer lacks the authority and/or is harming the economy.

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