Capitol Hill's M.O.: Push it through, read it later

Friday, July 24, 2020
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

1 storm clouds over U.S. CapitolIt appears America's elected officials in Congress are up to their old tricks, pushing through legislation at the last minute that none of them has time to fully digest before a vote is taken.

The August recess for Congress is just around the corner – and as of right now, the House and Senate don't plan to be in session for much of the month. Does this mean Americans could see another massive spending bill that no one has time to read? Adam Michel of The Heritage Foundation thinks so, although he says that's nothing new in Washington.

"That's a perpetual concern in Washington: they wait until the last minute, as evidenced by the unemployment insurance expiring – and because it created a crisis, they passed a 1,000-page piece of legislation that barely anyone has had time to read," Michel laments.

Michel

"So, that's sort of business as normal on the hill, and certainly not a good way to make public policy or debate the merits of any number of proposals they'll stuff in there."

Republican leaders have been meeting with President Donald Trump to come to terms with what the GOP would like to see done, but items such as a Social Security payroll tax cut proposed by the Trump administration have not been favored by Senate Republicans. The White House dropped that effort on Thursday.

In terms of what Republicans appear to agree on, that involves billions of dollars for testing and reopening schools. The must-have centerpiece for Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is a liability shield to protect businesses, schools, and others from coronavirus-related lawsuits.

The still-unreleased GOP measure forges an immediate agreement with Democrats on another round of $1,200 checks to most adults.

The $600 weekly unemployment benefit boost would be cut back, and it allegedly would ultimately be redesigned to provide a typical worker 70% of his or her income. Republicans say extending it in full would be a disincentive to work.

Republicans will need support from Democrats in the House and Senate for passage.

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