Outdated programs a bipartisan concern

Friday, February 28, 2020
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

hand on computer keyboardDespite America's technological bells and whistles, a new report finds Uncle Sam has a lot of government waste in outdated federal software.

Representative Ted Budd (R-North Carolina) highlights the problem in a publication of his called "Budd's Budget Busters." Pointing to information from the Government Accountability Office (GAO), Rep. Budd says 75 percent of the federal government's IT funding goes toward maintaining outdated legacy software.

"The Department of Justice and the Social Security Administration still operate programming code from the 1950s and the 1960s," says Budd. "That's ridiculous."

According to Budd, the Department of Treasury still uses a pair of nearly 60-year-old systems.

"The Department of Veterans Affairs maintains veterans benefits on more than a 50-year-old system," he continues. "When I was at the Pentagon, I was able to see the 50-year-old system of eight-inch floppy disks in operation for our country's nuclear arsenal."

He says this software is still in use in 2020 because no one is being held accountable to update them.

Budd

"I think they're afraid that if we did update them, just like a business, you'd have to make cuts; you'd have to spend maybe a little more on software and a little less on people," Budd poses. "We could certainly do that in the government, and it would be a lot better off for it, and probably more secure."

The North Carolina representative recently shared these and other findings at the Democratic Party-controlled House Budget Committee.

"The chairman commented on the end, 'Thank you for pointing out the problems with legacy software,'" reports Budd. "So this is a bipartisan issue for sure, one that costs taxpayers dollars to maintain these older systems that are insecure, fragile, and very, very expensive to maintain."

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