NH has plan to block disenfranchising of voters

Thursday, January 23, 2020
 | 
Chad Groening (OneNewsNow.com)

Electoral College (illustrative)A conservative activist and columnist is concerned about an effort by Democrats that would effectively eliminate the Electoral College.

As reported over the weekend by OneNewsNow, legislators in New Hampshire are proposing legislation aimed at heading off an effort by Democrats to change the way Electoral College votes are allocated. The California-based group National Popular Vote has already convinced 15 states plus Washington, DC, to sign on to an interstate compact which would award their electors to the winner of the national popular vote – regardless of the outcome within their own state borders.

The compact would go into effect when states holding 270 electors – enough to win an election – have agreed to participate. Right now they have 196 votes, 74 short of the 270.

Robert Knight, a columnist for The Washington Times, explains that such legislation – which he considers unconstitutional – would effectively disenfranchise voters.

Robert Knight"The idea is that if you vote for Donald Trump … and you're in a state that actually votes for Donald Trump – but your state legislators have agreed to cast all your [state's] electoral votes to the Democrat who wins the popular vote – you're effectively disenfranchised," he tells OneNewsNow.

"If they go for this route, I think you'll see it in the courts very quickly – which is all the more reason to protect the courts and put constitutionally minded judges on them to deal with this kind of attack on the Constitution."

The conservative columnist says he likes the proposed New Hampshire bill, which would withhold the release of popular vote tallies until after the Electoral College has met and cast their votes.

"They won't have all the states counted [in order to do that]," he points out. "So, it's like a poison pill: they're throwing a little log in front of that train."

Daily Signal columnist Tara Ross predicts that proponents of the National Popular Vote scheme will claim that proposals like that in New Hampshire violate federal reporting requirements. "But they don't, [as] those federal laws cannot require a state to turn in popular vote totals," she writes.

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