After 1 mo., most Dems have given up impeachment hopes

Saturday, November 16, 2019
 | 
Michael F. Haverluck (OneNewsNow.com)

Nancy Pelosi announces impeachment inquiryA majority of Democratic voters recently polled now think that the impeachment inquiry will fail and that President Donald Trump will finish out his first term in office.

“The survey of 445 Democratic voters found that 56 percent said they think Trump will remain in office until 2020 – a 7-point uptick compared to the results of an identical poll last month,” The Hill revealed from its Hill-HarrisX Survey. “Twenty-five (25) percent of Democrats in the new survey, meanwhile, said they think Trump will leave office before the end of his first term.”

An even greater proportion of those identifying with the GOP feel Democrats’ impeachment efforts are in vain.

“A larger percentage of the 385 Republicans polled also said Trump would finish his first term,” The Hill’s Tess Bonn added. “The percentage of GOP voters who said that the president would complete his term increased from 89 percent in October to 93 percent in the latest survey.”

Slightly less than three out of four voters registering as independents think Trump will make it until election day, which is reflective of all 1,204 registered voters in general who were surveyed on November 8 and 9 – marking the first day of Democrats’ public impeachment inquiry hearings alleging the president pressed the Ukraine to investigate 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden and his son, Hunter Biden, for using the position of vice president under the Obama administration to secure lucrative business contracts.

“Seventy-four (74) percent of 349 independent respondents now said the same thing – marking a 14-point increase from the Oct. 11 poll,” the Washington daily reported. “Overall, 73 percent of voters … said it was likely that Trump would complete his first term, while 14 percent said it was unlikely – 13 percent said they weren't sure.”

The Trump administration has discounted the probe’s validity.

“The White House, meanwhile, has dismissed the public hearing as ‘boring’ and a ‘sham,’ arguing that Democrats should instead be focused on passing the new trade deal known as the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement,” Bonn noted. “Trump also went on the offensive, tweeting ‘NEVER TRUMPERS’ and ‘READ THE TRANSCRIPT’ just hours before the hearing was set to begin.”

The allegations continue …

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) is accusing Trump of using “bribery” for his own political gain and called the hearing a “successful day for truth,” but she contended Americans need more time to change their minds against the president.

“Impeaching is a divisive thing in our country – it’s hard,” Pelosi expressed at a news conference Thursday, according to The Western Journal. “The place that our country is now, it’s not a time where you go to 70 percent when President Nixon walked out of the White House. It wasn’t there before he left, even two weeks before he left – until the other shoe fell and he walked out of the door.”

She endeavored to make Trump look worse than former President Richard Nixon before he was impeached in 1974.

“By the way, what President Trump has done on the record in terms of acting to advantage his, a foreign power to help him in his own election and the obstruction of information about that – the coverup – makes what Nixon did look almost small,” Pelosi claimed.

Get your facts straight …

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy highlighted the problems Democrats will have with key facts that contradict Pelosi’s accusations. He quoted Rep. Elise Stefanik’s (R-N.Y.) words from Wednesday’s hearing on the matter.

“For the millions of Americans viewing today, the two most important facts are the following: Number 1: Ukraine received the aid.” McCarthy quoted Zelensky in a tweet Wednesday. “Number 2: There was, in fact, no investigation into Biden.”

More and more evidence continues to surface, indicating Democrats have little to no case.

“First, the transcript of Trump’s July 25 call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky shows no quid pro quo,” The Western Journal’s Randy DeSoto pointed out. “Further, Zelensky has stated on multiple occasions he did not feel pressured by Trump’s phone call to open an investigation into former Vice President Joe Biden or his son, Hunter.”Bottom of Form

Nothing appears to corroborate the core of what Democrats are attempting to prove.Top of FormBottom of Form

“Based on testimony by acting U.S. ambassador to the Ukraine Bill Taylor on Wednesday, Ukraine had no knowledge the aid was being withheld until after Trump’s call with Zelensky, making it very hard to argue a quid pro quo had been suggested,” DeSoto recounted. “Finally, the aid was in fact released in mid-September.”

Nancy wrong again?

Contradicting Pelosi’s sentiment that Trump’s actions were more blatantly wrong than Nixon’s, Americans – especially along party lines – are divided when it to whether they believe he should be impeached.

“Eighty-nine (89) percent of Democrats currently say Trump should be impeached and removed from office – compare[d] with 71% of Democrats who in 1974 said the charges against Nixon warranted his removal from office,” the Gallup Poll explained. “Among Republicans, 92% reject Trump being impeached and removed from office, while just 7% are in favor of it. Under Nixon, a smaller 59% of his fellow Republicans opposed his removal from office, while 31% endorsed it.”

Even though more people support impeachment now than during the Special Counsel Robert Mueller probe, less and less Americans in recent weeks believe Trump should be impeached – and if the trend continues, less than half will have that sentiment before long.

“Gallup's new update from an Oct. 14–31, survey finds 51% of all Americans in favor of Trump being impeached and removed from office – essentially unchanged from 52% in an early October survey,” Gallup’s Jeffrey M. Jones divulged. “Support for removing Trump remains higher than earlier this year, when the question was asked in the context of special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into possible Trump campaign ties with Russia in the 2016 election.”

Overall today, less Americans believe Trump should be ousted from the White House than Nixon.

“The percentage of U.S. adults who currently think Trump should be impeached and removed from office is lower than it was for Nixon in August 1974, 58%,” Jones informed. “Prior polls that year showed between 44% and 48% of Americans saying the charges against Nixon were serious enough to warrant his removal as president.”

Virtually everyone in America today has a view on the topic.

“In 1974, more Americans did not express an opinion about the president being removed from office (11%) than do so now (1%),” Jones continued. “Ten percent of both Democrats and Republicans did not have an opinion about removing Nixon from office, compared with 1% for each party group now.”

In the face of Pelosi’s view, it is argued that Trump’s actions are nowhere near the serious nature of Nixon’s.

“Watergate involved the actual crime of breaking into the Democratic National Committee’s headquarters in Washington, D.C., during Nixon’s re-election campaign, and him being caught on tape conspiring to cover up White House involvement,” DeSoto reminded. “It is becoming increasing clear – apparently even to Democratic voters – that no smoking gun of Trump wrongdoing exists, because there was in fact no crime.”

And Trump’s transparency appears to be helping his case, as well.

“The president was quick to release the transcript of the call with Zelensky, and proudly stood by his request for Ukraine to investigate public corruption in their country – even if it implicates the Bidens,” DeSoto stressed. “[Trump supporters are] hoping that the Democrats’ purely political impeachment push backfires and propels Trump to a landslide victory in 2020, while returning control of the House to Republicans.”

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