Values at stake in Canada's election

Monday, October 21, 2019
 | 
Chad Groening, Charlie Butts (OneNewsNow.com)

voter casting a ballotA Canadian Christian educator and pundit believes the Great White North is poised to put a minority Conservative government in power today.

In a Politico compilation of polls, the Conservatives stand with 32 percent of the vote, and Justin Trudeau's Liberals are at 30 percent. The New Democrats, or NDP, another left-wing party, are third with 17 percent.

Dr. Charles McVety, president of Canada Christian College and of the Institute for Canadian Values, believes a minority Conservative government is likely. Though he says NDP, along with the Bloc Quebecois, could complicate the path to a majority government.

"A minority government in Canada is sort of what you have in the United States right now, where Donald Trump is the Republican president, but the majority of the legislature is left-wing liberal Democrat," Dr. McVety compares.

McVety

He warns the NDP and the Liberals could attempt to form a coalition government to prevent Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer from becoming prime minister.

"It's happened several times provincially, but it's never happened in Canadian history in the federal Parliament," the pundit notes.

McVety does not think that is a likely scenario.

Alex Schadenberg of the Euthanasia Prevention Coalition tells OneNewsNow about Carter vs Canada, the landmark Canadian Supreme Court decision that imposed euthanasia on all Canadians in 2015 and instructed Parliament to pass a law to deal with it. He says the candidates made their positions on the issue plain in a recent national telecast.

"Only one party leader has even been willing to say that he has great concerns about euthanasia, and that is the leader of the Conservative Party, Andrew Scheer," Schadenberg reports.

Schadenberg, Alex (EPC)Liberal candidates support euthanasia, and current Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has announced that he would expand the practice if he is re-elected.

"The liberal government announced that they're getting so excited to have a six-month review of the euthanasia law starting in June of 2020," the Coalition chair relays. "And now, during the election, they're getting so excited by winning that extreme position of wanting more euthanasia that they are now saying, 'Oh, well, we're going to expand euthanasia right after the election.'"

So Schadenberg raises the question of where democracy comes into play in that, because citizens are being denied the right to provide input on possible changes.

Canada is already considering whether to allow mental patients and children to be euthanized.

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