Vows to stop 'fracking' a shallow promise to Left

Thursday, September 12, 2019
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

fracking in ColoradoAnyone keeping up with the Democratic Party knows the presidential contenders claim to embrace windmills and solar power, and say they despise fossil fuels and so-called “fracking.”

Several candidates, in fact, are vowing to ban fracking if voters put them in the White House.

"They're going to have a little bit of trouble doing that," responds Thomas Pyle at American Energy Alliance (AEA). "They're going to run into this thing called the Constitution."

Fracking, or hydraulic fracturing, is the injection of fluid into shale beds at high pressure in order to free up petroleum resources such as oil or natural gas.

Among several concerns, critics claim fracking damages the water supply and can even cause earthquakes. 

Debate debate (three)During the coal-hating Obama administration, utilities began using more natural gas due to increased regulations on coal, and fracking in turn helped make natural gas more readily available.

Natural gas provided 35 percent of the nation's electricity last year and only coal came close to beating figure that at 27.4 percent.

Yet the leading Democratic contenders claim fracking harms the environment, so the process is routinely denounced in the same campaign speech as fossil fuels and the oil industry.

Pyle says candidates are welcome to say they want to ban fracking but the president can't unilaterally ban fracking, especially on private lands. 

gasoline pumps"What they can do, and what they will do no doubt, is they will shut it down on federal lands," he advises. "It's very easy to do that by just basically delaying and dragging out the permitting process, and not offering areas of the federal estate that's available for lease for the industry to even bid on."

Pyle predicts a Democratic president would have a harder time going after fracking on private lands, the main source of the effort, though he points out the Obama administration attempted to use environmental laws such as the Clean Air Act and the Endangered Species attack to step onto private property and dictate what is allowed.  

“So, for rhetorical purposes, they say, Yeah, we're going to ban it, (but) they can't. It's impossible,” he tells OneNewsNow. “But they can do a whole lot of damage with the regulations."

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