Conservative Party can compete but there is a problem: Quebec

Friday, July 19, 2019
 | 
Chad Groening (OneNewsNow.com)

J. Trudeau speaking to parliamentCanada’s liberal leaders are ruling parliament in the divided country and a conservative leader predicts that will continue until a voting bloc is broken up.

Conservatives have been leading in polling since February, owing to a scandal that leads directly to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (pictured at left), but that advantage has shrunk just in recent weeks and his numbers are back up.

Dr. Charles McVety, president of the Institute for Canadian Values, tells OneNewsNow the biggest obstacle for Canada's conservatives remains the liberal-leaning province of Quebec, the second-largest behind Ontario with approximately 8.1 million people.

In the House of Commons, with a total of 330 parliamentary seats, liberal Quebec occupies nearly one-quarter of the seats,

“And they vote,” McVety says, “almost exclusively one direction.”

With a quarter of the seats, he explains, it’s not difficult to form a “minority” government with 35 percent of the seats or a “majority” government with 50 percent of them. 

McVety

Meanwhile, national elections are coming in October and tracking polls compiled by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation show Conservatives and Liberals are almost neck and neck. Conservatives lead substantially in Alberta and the Prairie provinces while the Liberals lead in British Columbia, the Maritimes --- and Quebec. They have a slight lead in Ontario.

Compared to the political fighting in the U.S., McVety says the Quebec factor is far tougher for Conservatives to overcome than Republicans in the United States working against electoral voters in New York state and California.   

Comments

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWSBRIEF

SUBSCRIBE

VOTE IN OUR POLL

What's your reaction to California's new law restricting 'use of deadly force' by police officers?

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

Trump moves to curb abuse of immigration rules
5 arrested for stealing millions from elderly, disabled vets
Trump signs student debt forgiveness for disabled veterans
Trump calls comments by Danish leader 'nasty'
  After school Nazi salute video, more racist videos emerge

LATEST FROM THE WEB

Triggering the Google social credit system
How colleges waste money on expensive new buildings
The perils of trading social interaction for social media
Trump: 'I don't buy Rep. Rashida Tlaib's tears... she hates Israel and all Jewish people'
Mainstream press stoking racial tension to paint 'whites as the enemy,' says Heather Mac Donald

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day
NEXT STORY
Bernie, Warren push universal health, Green New Deal vs. field

Sanders, Warren embracingThe Democratic debacle continued Tuesday night in Detroit, Michigan, during the second presidential primary debate, as ultra-leftists Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) took on the other eight candidates defending universal healthcare and the Green New Deal, which many conservatives believe would bankrupt America.