Will 'Build the Wall' bill seal Trump's campaign promise?

Saturday, October 20, 2018
 | 
Steve Jordahl (OneNewsNow.com)

US-Mexico border wall patrolHouse Republicans will be introducing a bill to completely fund President Donald Trump's border wall, and one of the legislation’s co-sponsors hopes this will push it through so that the president can finally make good on his campaign promise.

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy says he will drop the Build the Wall, Enforce the Law Act when United States Congress returns to Washington after the November elections.

As a co-sponsor of the bill, Rep. Jim Banks (R-Ind.) is not taking the handling of this monumental legislation lightly.

“This will be a significant debate that will occur in the lame-duck session,” Banks explained. “But the Build the Wall Act has been introduced early, so that the American people can see what they are going to get when we get to that point.”

However, he says that Americans can expect the issue to be pushed in the lead up to November 6 by both sides – as a campaign issue.

“One of the biggest promises that President Trump made as a candidate, and one of the reasons, I believe, that he won the election in 2016 to begin with, was his promise to make border security – and ultimately to build a wall – as one of his top priorities,” the congressman stressed. “Unfortunately, we haven't gotten that done yet.”

Banks maintains that he is supporting the bill because it is the right thing for the country -- and for his district.

“I'm one who believes that building a wall and enhancing our border security has as much to do with preventing illegal immigration as it does to keep America safe,” he expressed.

He says that he is concerned about certain areas of the country that are getting the brunt of the ill-effects of illegal immigration.

“But I also live in a part of the country that is just getting hit harder and harder by the drug epidemic, and we know that a lot of these drugs are coming over the border illegally,” Banks noted.

The bill has a good chance of passing in the House, but it is anticipated that it will struggle in the Senate.

If Republicans win big in November, the bill can be reintroduced in January.

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