We don't need a revolution, just law and order

Tuesday, July 12, 2016
 | 
Steve Jordahl (OneNewsNow.com)

Revolutionary War artworkAmerica's political system is broken, says a historian, but the fault ultimately lies with the people. 

"The system is broken but that doesn't mean the process constitutionally is broken," observes David Barton, known for his Wallbuilders organization and its defense of the Founding Fathers.

"The constitutional process still works well," he tells OneNewsNow. "We're just not using that process."

The state of the United States can best be described as upheaval. One example is the popularity of Donald Trump and Sen. Bernie Sanders over so-called "establishment" candidates, pointing to a grassroots-level frustration with Washington, D.C.

Hillary and Barack team upLast week, the actions of FBI Director James Comey (pictured below) describing how Hillary Clinton broke federal law, then announcing she won't be prosecuted, is a second example.

Last year, the federal government added about 3,850 new federal laws. Only 126 of them were passed by Congress and signed by the President. The rest were written as federal regulations – literally a stroke of President Obama's pen.

In 1776, the colonists took up arms and broke from Great Britain because laws and taxes were being levied on them without their representation. So is it time for a second American Revolution?

No, it's not, says Barton. It's true that the political process is "broken," he says, because laws are meant to be debated and created in the U.S. House and U.S. Senate, and the President signs them or vetoes them.

FBI Director Comey press conferenceBut there is also the issue of the apathetic American voter. 

Since 1980, he says, only one out of every six Americans has chosen the president of the United States. One in eight has chosen governors, senators and House members.

"I don't blame that on the politicians," he says. "I blame that on the people."

The answer is not to take up arms but to take up the pen in the form of a vote.

"With an additional five million voters," he says, "we would have all of the House all of the Senate and the presidency in conservative hands."

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