Evangelicals set for Q&A with Trump

Monday, May 23, 2016
 | 
Steve Jordahl (OneNewsNow.com)

Trump holding up his Bible click imageThe leader of a prominent family advocacy group hopes to have a clearer picture of a potential Trump administration after the presidential hopeful meets with evangelical leaders in a few weeks.

(Right: Donald Trump holds up his Bible during speech at Values Voter Summit, Sept. 2015)

Donald Trump will meet privately with about 500 evangelical leaders next month. The convocation with the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is set for June 21 in New York City. American Family Association president Tim Wildmon is among those invited.

The meeting – which has the air of a slightly awkward first date – is being organized by Dr. Ben Carson on behalf of MyFaithVotes and United in Purpose, two groups interested in the evangelical vote.

It's going to be "a day of give and take," says Wildmon. "He's agreed to answer questions for a couple of hours from those attending," explains the AFA president, "and then he's going to also listen to what we have to say."

Top of the list for Wildmon is a commitment to the free exercise of faith from a Trump administration.

"I just would like for Donald Trump to keep the executive branch off the backs of Christians and let him understand what's going on with the religious freedom issue across the country," he tells OneNewsNow.

But Wildmon expects the discussion to be far-reaching and comprehensive and to include a myriad of topics:

Wildmon

"What kind of people are you going to surround yourself with? What kind of judges are you going to pick? What are your policies going to be as they relate to religious freedom, to life, some of the social/moral issues that we care about? Explain to us your relationship towards Israel."

The obvious temptation for the Republican front-runner is to tickle the ears of the leaders of millions of potential evangelical votes. But Wildmon is going in hopeful – adding: "I don't think Donald Trump's really been known for telling you what you want to hear."

According to FOX News' Todd Starnes, others invited include Dr. James Dobson, Southern Baptist Convention president Ronnie Floyd, Penny Nance of Concerned Women for America, attorney Kelly Shackleford with First Liberty, and pastors Jack Graham and Ed Young.


Editor's Note 1: The American Family Association is the parent organization of the American Family News Network, which operates OneNewsNow.com.

Editor's Note 2: Clarification added explaining who is organizing the meeting.

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