Healthcare enrollment + bolder cyberattacks = a concerning combo

Tuesday, September 29, 2015
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

At least one congressman thinks Americans enrolling in health insurance on Healthcare.gov should be concerned about the security of their information.

Brady, Kevin (R-TX)Representative Kevin Brady's (R-TX) warning comes ahead of the second anniversary (October 1) of the launch of Healthcare.gov. 

"Our government has stored sensitive, personal information on millions of Americans in a Healthcare.gov computer system plagued with basic security flaws," he points out. "An official audit uncovered slipshod practices at Healthcare.gov that raise serious concerns about the government's ability to protect the vast database that's already cost taxpayers over $100 million."

The official audit Brady is referring to is a report released by the Health and Human Services inspector general's office. The Obama administration claims it acted quickly to fix all of the problems identified, but the Associated Press reports that the episode "raises questions about the government's ability to protect a vast new database at a time when cyberattacks are becoming bolder."

"When cyberattacks like the one on the federal Office of Personnel Management (OPM) are becoming bolder, we should be worried that your names, Social Security numbers, birthdates, addresses, phone numbers, passport numbers, employment status, and financial information is now in the government's Healthcare.gov database," Brady contends. "The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) says this sounds like a gold mine for identity thieves."

OneNewsNow has contacted the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) requesting comment.

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