Hillary's health care strategy: Blame drug companies

Tuesday, September 22, 2015
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

Hillary Clinton is expected to officially roll out her proposed changes to ObamaCare today, Tuesday, but don't expect to hear the words "repeal and replace" mentioned. 

CNN reports that Clinton sees things in ObamaCare that she does not support and would like to see changed.

Healthcare.gov header 2014 620x300For instance, Clinton wants to address rising prescription drug costs by bargaining with drug companies for lower prices.

Clinton is also in favor of examining the so-called Cadillac tax in ObamaCare that unions and center-right groups oppose, albeit for different reasons.

Still, speaking to an audience in New Hampshire this month, Clinton said that the Affordable Care Act is here to stay, echoing statements made by President Obama and many Democrats in the wake of Supreme Court rulings upholding the health care law.

Phil Kerpen, president of American Commitment, tells OneNewsNow that ObamaCare is really the "Hillary health care plan," referring to the former First Lady's health care plan unveiled in 1993 (see video below.)

"But I think that she has adopted what's now become sort of the standard, liberal, Democratic insurance strategy," he says, "which is to try to scapegoat the prescription drug companies for the rising costs of Obamacare."

At the same time, Kerpen says, it was those same insurance companies that cooperated with Democrats and ObamaCare.

Kerpen

"About nine cents on the health care dollar are prescription drug costs," Kerpen advises, "but the insurance industry is in bed with the Democrats and the government. And they're now together looking for someone to blame as out of pocket costs go up, as premiums go up, as provider networks get smaller, instead of taking responsibility and actually reopening sort of the heart of ObamaCare, which are the subsidies and the mandates."

Meanwhile, Kerpen warns that price controls on prescription drugs could be a "disaster," because it will worsen efforts to research and develop new medicines, and therefore hurt efforts to cure disease.

The cost of bringing a new drug to market can be as high as $2 billion, he says.

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