Advice to politicians: Don't 'punt' on faith-related questions

Saturday, February 14, 2015
 | 
Chad Groening (OneNewsNow.com)

A creation scientist with the apologetics ministry Answers in Genesis argues that it's important that political candidates answer questions posed to them that deal with biblical principles.

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker has been getting a lot of media attention lately because of his rise in the polls in both New Hampshire and Iowa. Walker is seen as the possible go-to candidate for Christian conservatives because of his faith. But he left some Christians scratching their heads recently after he "punted" when asked if he believes in the theory of evolution.

"I'm going to have to punt on that one as well," he replied during an appearance at a British think-tank in London. He had also declined to answer questions on foreign policy.

Dr. Georgia Purdom, a creation scientist with Answers in Genesis, admits she isn't surprised that Walker – like many candidates for public office – wanted to avoid the evolution question.

Purdom

"They don't want to answer that question because they realize it is a very emotional topic, it's a very hot topic, and there's a lot of divided opinion about it no matter what your political association is," she explains. "So that's probably why he wanted to avoid the question and not answer it."

But Purdom says it is important for politicians to provide honest answers to questions that can potentially impact a voter's decision.

"It is important where he stands on that issue because it's relevant to a lot of other things," she continues. "If he believes in how God defines marriage in Genesis between one man and one woman – well, that has to do with the homosexual marriage issue. How does he define life? Is life created in the image of God? That's defined in Genesis and that has to do with the abortion issue."

Because the issue of creation is related to so many other issues, Purdom believes it is important for a candidate to answer such questions.

Comments

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

FEATURED PODCAST

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWSBRIEF

SUBSCRIBE

VOTE IN OUR POLL

What's behind the leftward-drift among major Protestant denominations in America?

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

Eleven US troops flown to medical centers after Iran strike
Virginia's highest court upholds weapons ban at gun rally
Rollback proposed for Michelle Obama school lunch guidelines
Iowa Democrats treat Warren-Sanders dust-up as 'Who cares?'
California teachers sue after jetliner dumps fuel on schools
Trump's impeachment trial begins, senators vowing 'impartial justice'
Dershowitz, Starr on Trump impeachment legal team

LATEST FROM THE WEB

Trump honors national champion LSU Tigers at White House
Iran's Supreme Leader calls Trump a 'clown' during first sermon in eight years, and he just fired back in a tweet
Rand Paul warns Republicans could block witnesses for Trump
Is threat of suicide bombings against Americans in Middle East imminent?
Did CNN finally push its biases too far for the American people?

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day
NEXT STORY
McConnell could stop Loretta Lynch

Even though President Obama's nomination for the next attorney general has advanced out of the Senate Judiciary Committee, a former Justice Department attorney says her confirmation is far from a done deal.