'Deepest suspicions' about D.C. confirmed

Thursday, December 6, 2012
 | 
Russ Jones (OneNewsNow.com)

Four conservative Republicans say they've been "purged" from key committee assignments because of their principles.

The day after House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) announced the changes, a removed congressman lashed out against GOP leadership.

The Republican Steering Committee removed Walter Jones of North Carolina and David Schweikert of Arizona from the Financial Services Committee; Justin Amash of Michigan and Tim Huelskamp of Kansas were removed from the House Budget Committee.

Huelskamp, Tim (R-Kansas)Rep. Huelskamp spoke out about his removal during a weekly bloggers briefing at The Heritage Foundation.

"It confirms in my mind the deepest suspicions of most Americans about Washington, D.C.," he stated. "Is it's petty, it's vindictive, and if you have any conservative principles, you will be punished."

As a freshman congressman backed by tea party supporters, Boehner and other GOP leaders assured Huelskamp he could vote his principles and the views of his district. But this action against him tells him otherwise.

"We've heard from multiple sources that someone walked in with a list of votes and said if you didn't reach your particular scorecard of what was considered the right vote, which, by the way, in most cases was not the conservative position, then we're going to have to remove you from the committee," the Kansas representative relays. "All that took place behind closed doors, which is again a problem with Washington, D.C. Whether it's the budget negotiations, whether it's everything else, it's usually done behind closed doors."

Huelskamp was also booted from the House Agriculture Committee. So for the first since at least the 1960s, agriculture-rich Kansas will not be represented on that committee.

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