U.S. gets tougher on China and human rights abuses

Monday, July 13, 2020
 | 
Charlie Butts, Billy Davis (OneNewsNow.com)

Trump and Chinese presidentThe United States appears to stepping up its vocal support for Uyghurs, a religious minority in China, who are enduring brutal hardships at the hands of the communist-run country.

Brynne Lawrence of watchdog group China Aid tells OneNewsNow the U.S. Treasury Dept. is sanctioning key members in China’s communist party, and China’s public security bureau, in response to abuse of the Uyghurs, a Muslim community located in the Xinjiang region of China.

That punishment comes after the U.S. State Department and U.S. Department of Commerce have cited a number of Chinese officials.

OneNewsNow reported in a Jan. story that Chinese authorities routinely arrest Uyghurs and other Muslim minorities to “re-educate” them in prison camps, where they are beaten and tortured, and forced to learn and recite Chinese Communist Party songs and beliefs.

China Shipping Line (Chinese goods)Congress passed a measure in January that denounced China’s persecution of Uyghurs and started the process for U.S. agencies to sanction Chinese officials.

More recently, in early July, U.S. customs officials made a gruesome discovery: a cargo ship from China that contained 13 tons of human hair. The hair likely came from prisoners and the finished product was likely produced by forced labor, a spokesman for the National Security Council announced.

“They're being tortured and starved, and forced into labor,” Lawrence says of the political prisoners. “And they're subjecting the women to mandatory pregnancy checks, forced abortion, and sterilization.”

According to the Fox News story, equipment manufacturer Caterpillar was receiving clothing from factories that operated in the Xinjiang region, which likely means the clothing was produced using slave labor.

Uyghur prisonersThe corporation said in a statement its does not “condone” forced labor and child labor, and strives to “eliminate all forms” of such practices.

Yet watchdog groups and media outlets have reported on China's slave labor for decades and continue to do so today, which means Chinese-made products reach U.S. shores every day using slave labor and enriching the U.S. corporations that operate in China. 

There is currently a complaint before the International Criminal Court to investigate genocide in China but it is unlikely to go far since China has a seat on the United Nations Human Rights Council. 

Comments

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWS BRIEF

SUBSCRIBE

FEATURED PODCAST

VOTE IN OUR POLL

The biggest highlight from the final presidential debate was…(Pick up to two)

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

Maine supreme court declines to extend mail-in vote deadline
US Navy: 2 onboard training plane killed in Alabama crash
Fighting over Nagorno-Karabakh goes on despite US mediation
Trump, Biden scrap on oil, virus with just over a week to go
Trump campaign sues in Nevada to stop Vegas-area vote count
Some hospitals in crisis as US nears high for COVID-19 cases

LATEST FROM THE WEB

San Bernardino, Calif., police shooting sparks night of unrest
Trump 'coyote' remark confuses Twitter, including Georgia state Democrat
Putin: Russia-China military alliance can't be ruled out
Trump calls Biden's 'transition from' oil comments 'perhaps most shocking admission ever made'
Oops: Photograph of Joe Biden and Hunter's business partner found on Burisma's website

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day
NEXT STORY
Abducted, imprisoned girl is now expecting

arranged marriage in PakistanThe situation involving an Pakistani Christian girl and her family has become more complex, but her family and their advocates are not giving up on the fight to bring her home.