U.S. gets tougher on China and human rights abuses

Monday, July 13, 2020
 | 
Charlie Butts, Billy Davis (OneNewsNow.com)

Trump and Chinese presidentThe United States appears to stepping up its vocal support for Uyghurs, a religious minority in China, who are enduring brutal hardships at the hands of the communist-run country.

Brynne Lawrence of watchdog group China Aid tells OneNewsNow the U.S. Treasury Dept. is sanctioning key members in China’s communist party, and China’s public security bureau, in response to abuse of the Uyghurs, a Muslim community located in the Xinjiang region of China.

That punishment comes after the U.S. State Department and U.S. Department of Commerce have cited a number of Chinese officials.

OneNewsNow reported in a Jan. story that Chinese authorities routinely arrest Uyghurs and other Muslim minorities to “re-educate” them in prison camps, where they are beaten and tortured, and forced to learn and recite Chinese Communist Party songs and beliefs.

China Shipping Line (Chinese goods)Congress passed a measure in January that denounced China’s persecution of Uyghurs and started the process for U.S. agencies to sanction Chinese officials.

More recently, in early July, U.S. customs officials made a gruesome discovery: a cargo ship from China that contained 13 tons of human hair. The hair likely came from prisoners and the finished product was likely produced by forced labor, a spokesman for the National Security Council announced.

“They're being tortured and starved, and forced into labor,” Lawrence says of the political prisoners. “And they're subjecting the women to mandatory pregnancy checks, forced abortion, and sterilization.”

According to the Fox News story, equipment manufacturer Caterpillar was receiving clothing from factories that operated in the Xinjiang region, which likely means the clothing was produced using slave labor.

Uyghur prisonersThe corporation said in a statement its does not “condone” forced labor and child labor, and strives to “eliminate all forms” of such practices.

Yet watchdog groups and media outlets have reported on China's slave labor for decades and continue to do so today, which means Chinese-made products reach U.S. shores every day using slave labor and enriching the U.S. corporations that operate in China. 

There is currently a complaint before the International Criminal Court to investigate genocide in China but it is unlikely to go far since China has a seat on the United Nations Human Rights Council. 

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