Freedom – A victim of communism

Wednesday, July 1, 2020
 | 
Chad Groening, Charlie Butts (OneNewsNow.com)

China's Xi in front of CCP meetA national defense analyst says China's government has taken a step to begin the brutal repression of what's left of liberty and those who aspire to it in Hong Kong. 

China's Communist Party has formally enacted a national security law that will allow the authoritarian regime to crack down on what it calls the subversive and secessionist activity in Hong Kong.

"They will be rounded up, certainly those who have been in any way, shape, or form implicated in these demonstrations," Frank Gaffney, president and CEO of the Center for Security Policy, recently told American Family Radio. "They will probably be disappeared, perhaps to concentration camps. They will be denied their rights in any meaningful way."

Gaffney

Gaffney says freedom in Hong Kong is yet another victim of what he calls the China Communist Party Virus.

"Basically, those demonstrations were stopped by the pandemic," he observes. "That was the beginning of the end, because inexorably, Xi Jinping, the dictator of China, moved to get this law enacted and begin the brutal repression of what's left of liberty and those who aspire to it in Hong Kong."

Meanwhile in America, Congress has thrown politics aside to deal with one aspect of internal events in China.

OneNewsNow has previously reported on China's mistreatment of the ethnic and religious minority in Xinjiang. Now President Trump has signed into law the Uyghur Human Rights Policy Act of 2020.

Brynne Lawrence of China Aid tells OneNewsNow the Muslims there have been severely mistreated.

"This includes the constant surveillance of Uyghur people with advanced technology," she reports. "It also includes policing elements of their life and rounding them up and incarcerating them in so-called re-education camps."

More than a million people have been imprisoned, and survivors have said they were tortured, starved, and forced to work long hours at low or no pay. The fact that the U.S. House voted 413 to 1 to approve the measure clearly indicates the magnitude of the problem.

"It sends a complete message about seriousness, and it also sends the message that this is not a political issue," Lawrence submits. "That's something that we have seen at China Aid time and time again. This type of stuff is something that transcends politics, and… often these kinds of things, they can enjoy a very bipartisan support within the U.S. Congress."

The law gives America the right to place penalties on those responsible for the persecution and restrict them from coming to the U.S. 

Christians in China are likely sympathetic because, after all, they have been persecuted for decades.

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