'Expedited removal' policy gets a thumbs-up

Wednesday, July 24, 2019
 | 
Chad Groening (OneNewsNow.com)

Dept. of Homeland Security emblemAn immigration attorney argues the Trump administration is on strong legal grounds to overcome a challenge to its decision to fast-track deportations across the U.S.

The Department of Homeland Security says the new policy extends the power of immigration officers to fast-track the deportation of illegal immigrants who have been in the country for less than two years. With limited exceptions, "expedited removal" gives agents broad authority to deport individuals without allowing them to appear before an immigration judge, even if they express fear of returning home and pass an initial screening interview for asylum.

Fox News reports that the American Civil Liberties Union and the American Immigration Council have vowed to sue to block enactment of the policy. But Art Arthur, a resident fellow in law and policy at the Center for Immigration Studies, contends the policy should withstand any legal challenge.

Arthur

"This is authorized by Congress. It's a procedure that has been reviewed in its current form by courts and passed that muster," he points out.

"[If legally challenged] it would go to the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia – and I have no doubt it's going to pass there as well," he continues. "Congress has plenary authority to set the terms and conditions on the admission of aliens into the United States and this is simply an expression of them doing so."

According to Arthur, the new policy will substantially ease the strain on the border.

"It will limit the number of new cases that are added to the backlog as ICE identifies individuals who have been in the United States less than two years and who entered illegally; and it can very quickly process those individuals and remove them from the United States," he explains.

The result, he predicts, will be an increased number of removals "without significantly burdening the current immigration court backlog."

Read Art Arthur's latest article on this issue

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