Army trying to rebound after 8 yrs. of Obama

Monday, November 20, 2017
 | 
Chad Groening (OneNewsNow.com)

military recruiting 620x300A conservative military watchdog is not convinced that the United States Army has truly changed its mind about lowering recruiting standards to deal with enlistment shortfalls.

U.S. Army Chief of Staff General Mark Milley announced last week that the Army has rescinded a memo that declared people with certain mental health issues – including self-mutilation, bipolar disorder, depression and drug and alcohol abuse – would be eligible for waivers to join the service.

Milley announced the change following a great deal of negative reaction, admitting that the Army did a terrible job of informing the public about the policy.

The military leader insisted that the guidelines on considering such waivers had not changed, but had been delegated to a lower echelon for approval.

Center for Military Readiness President Elaine Donnelly maintains that latest maneuverings do not truly change the underlying policy.

"It's Recruiting Command that is responsible for meeting recruiting quotas,” Donnelly explained. “They have a tough job. It's tougher in times of economic prosperity, but the fact that the Army even gave any thought at all to changing policy with regards to mental illnesses [says something]."

Donnelly believes that the Army may be masking deeper recruiting problems.

"Could it be that young women don't like the idea of being forced in the combat arms involuntarily?” she posed. “Could it be that parents are equally concerned? Could it be that the implementation of the transgender agenda is troubling a number of people? If there is something deeper going on?”

Donnelly stressed former President Barack Obama’s detrimental toll on the military over his two terms as commander-in-chief.

“They need to assess the full effect of eight years of social engineering under the previous administration," the military expert impressed.

Donnelly emphasized that the Trump administration has got to make some necessary changes to make things right with the U.S. Armed Forces again after eight straight years of deterioration.

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