Eyes on North Korea

Monday, March 20, 2017
 | 
Chad Groening (OneNewsNow.com)

North Korean missile launchA national defense analyst applauds Secretary of State Rex Tillerson for acknowledging that military action may be the only solution to the North Korean nuclear threat.

On Friday, Tillerson visited with North Korea on a military base near the Demilitarized Zone. Then during a news conference in Seoul, the secretary of state declared an end of the U.S. policy of "strategic patience" toward the East Asian country.

"Certainly we don't want for things to get to a military conflict," he stated. "We're quite clear on that in our communications. But obviously, if North Korea takes actions against South Korean forces or our own forces, then that will be met with an appropriate response."

Maginnis

Robert Maginnis, senior fellow for national security at the Family Research Council, has been saying for years that the U.S. must seriously consider taking military action to stop North Korea's march to nuclear weapons status.

"Obviously, sanctions up to now have failed to work," he observes. "The Chinese have failed to press the case that we have because, after all, they are a proxy of the Chinese Communist government. We have sat on the sidelines to a large degree since the years of the Clinton administration, watching this rogue regime develop a fairly robust ballistic missile capability."

On that note, former Republican presidential candidate Mike Huckabee told the Fox News Channel on Friday that China needs to take more responsibility for getting the North Korean regime under control. 

"Tillerson and the president are playing it exactly right. They're recognizing that we're not really going to have much influence over North Korea because they're led by a freaking lunatic," Huckabee said. "But the only entity that has any opportunity to put a lid on him will be China – because they need China; they depend on China. And China is the big brother who can put him in a half-Nelson and explain how it's going to be done. And I think that's exactly the right kind of pressure: put it on the third party, China, and make it clear [to China] 'If you don't get North Korea under control, you don't want the rest of us going in there and doing it, because it's not going to be pretty. So you better get your little brother under control.'" 

According to Maginnis, the North Koreans are working to miniaturize nuclear weapons to put on those missiles capable of threatening the American mainland.

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