Bible translation – a risk worth taking for future generations

Monday, August 26, 2019
 | 
Bill Bumpas (OneNewsNow.com)

Bible translator tabletThere's been a huge surge of interest in Bible translation in the world's largest Muslim country, where some people groups have been waiting for generations to experience God's Word in their own language.

Christians in Indonesia face daily persecution, and many are still without the Bible in their mother tongue. But that situation is changing, according to Bruce Smith, president and CEO of Wycliffe Associates.

"In the last three years, I think we've started around 150 new translations. We have a similar number on deck for the year ahead," he reports.

In order to complete translations quickly and safely, the ministry provides computer tablets and training to mother-tongue translators around the world. Those tablets – which allow translators to work offline – are "absolutely essential" for the translators, says Smith, because if paper copies of scripture translations are discovered, they could easily be destroyed.

Despite the current civil unrest in Indonesia and the climate of persecution against Christians, Smith tells OneNewsNow that church leaders are enthusiastic about getting God's Word into the hands of people in Indonesia.

"They know the hopelessness of their current situation, and they know how being without scripture has put them at a handicap and at a disadvantage for generations truly," Smith shares.

"And so when they see the opportunity to get God's Word into their language in this generation, that's very moving for them – and they're ready to put the time and energy and talent behind it that's needed in order for Bible translation to move forward."

Smith considers it a privilege to partner with believers in Indonesia who he says "will make any sacrifice, take any risk, to make Bibles available to their people."

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