TV execs run from timely pro-life ad

Thursday, June 3, 2021
 | 
Steve Jordahl (OneNewsNow.com)

hand with ultrasound wandTelevision networks are running from a pro-life ad that urges the public to follow the science, and the group behind the message says abortion supporters are ignoring an issue that is now before the nation’s highest court.

Susan B Anthony List produced the 30-second ad (see below), which says abortion supporters need to catch up with 50 years of technology that shows pregnant women the facial features of their 15-week-old fetus.

“Every age group has more opportunity to live – except one,” the ad states. “The unborn still fall victim to outdated laws.”

Prudence Robertson of the SBA List tells One News now three networks, so far, are refusing to run the ad.

“It's really unfortunate that several big media outlets like CBS, CMT and the Hallmark Channel are calling this ad controversial and unacceptable,” he says, “when, really, all it does is explain the humanity of unborn children.”

The heated abortion date is often relegated to pro-abortion talking points about “my body, my choice,” but pro-life activists often counter with basic biology about development of the human fetus. The pro-abortion counter to that science lesson, however, is to claim the fetus is a “blob” of cells and even a “parasite” in the womb that feeds off the woman's blood supply.  

The television censorship is not surprising, Robertson observes, since Big Tech and Big Media have chosen sides in the abortion debate. But the ad was produced, she says, in light of the U.S. Supreme Court agreeing to review a 15-week ban law in Mississippi, which could mean a landmark ruling is coming from the high court.

Not only is it time for federal abortion laws to catch up with the science, Robertson says, “it’s time for the courts to take the handcuffs off states and allow them to protect their unborn children.”

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