When facts mess up the narrative

Monday, October 28, 2019
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

pregnant woman handOne pro-lifer says the media is misleading people on a study about self-induced abortion.

"The American Journal of Public Health released a study recently which did some research on women who are going online to seek abortion pills, says Michael New, a visiting professor of social research and political science at The Catholic University of America and an associate scholar at the Charlotte Lozier Institute in Washington, D.C. "There is a website called Women on Web, which dispenses pills to women in countries where abortion is legally restricted. And U.S. women have sometimes logged on to this website and requested pills."

According to the study, about 6,000 U.S. women requested abortion pills from the website, and these were women in states that are "hostile to abortion." Based on this, it is believed that women from these states are more likely to request pills from this website.

New

"A lot of the coverage is misleading," says New, who wrote a related article for NationalReview.com. "First off, one thing that should be made clear is that no women actually received abortion pills from this website, [because] this website only sends abortion pills to women in countries where abortion is largely illegal. That's included in some of the stories, but it's not featured."

New suspects some people just read the headline and are under the impression that women were getting abortion pills through this website, when, in fact, they were not.

"Secondly, the number of women coming to ask this website is probably small," he continues. "It's about 6,000, and considering there's about 800,000 abortions annually, that means there's a pretty small percentage of abortion-minded women … interested in seeking abortion pills online."

It should also be noted that some of the women in the study might have gone online more than once.

"If that's the case, that could skew the results," New adds. "But the researchers don't really make any mention of that."

Comments

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

FEATURED PODCAST

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWSBRIEF

SUBSCRIBE

VOTE IN OUR POLL

Just once, I'd like to see the secular media …

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

Curfews ordered in more than dozen US cities
Protests heat up across US, governors call in National Guard
FBI says its top lawyer is leaving the bureau
‘Back in the game’: SpaceX ship blasts off with 2 astronauts
National Guard summoned to aid cities amid police clashes
Pentagon puts military police on alert to go to Minneapolis
What’s behind latest India-China border tension

LATEST FROM THE WEB

Trump says will not allow mob violence to rule
Knife-wielding woman shot and killed by police, days after her brother was arrested for ISIS terror plot
Opinion — Andrew McCarthy: Laws against rioting and terrorism must be enforced against Antifa and other violent radicals
Supreme Court rejects challenge to limits on church services; Roberts sides with liberals
In unusual move, US embassies in Africa speak up on Floyd

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day
NEXT STORY
What respectable company would condone this?

remote controlAMC is pushing profanity front and center by green-lighting a new show.