Streaming service called out for easy porn access

Wednesday, July 11, 2018
 | 
Bill Bumpas, Charlie Butts (OneNewsNow.com)

Teen on laptopA popular media streaming company is being called out for helping the public gain secretive access to pornography channels.

Dawn Hawkins of the National Center on Sexual Exploitation says Roku has a "backdoor" to private, sexually explicit channels while other competitors have stayed away from hardcore pornography.

"They are facilitating access to hardcore pornography channels - hundreds of private and hidden channels - and none of the other streaming companies allow this," Hawkins tells OneNewsNow.

Roku was founded by its current CEO, Anthony Wood, and National Center is asking the public to contact Wood and urge him to drop the controversial – and likely highly profitable – porn access.

Hawkins, Dawn (Nat'l Ctr on Sexual Exploitation)At the same time National Center is fighting Roku, the American Family Association is asking the Department of Justice to investigate Netflix for streaming "Desire," a 2017 film that depicts two pre-teen girls in a sexually explicit scene.

"It's just despicable and it's unacceptable and it's illegal," complains Buddy Smith, AFA senior vice president. "And they truly need to be investigated."

AFA sent an "Action Alert" to its supporters encouraging them to contact Attorney General Jeff Sessions about the graphic content in the film.

The film's director, defending the controversial scene, has said the two girls were "tricked" and were unaware of the sexual nature of the scene. 

Netflix was already in AFA's cultural cross hairs over "13 Reasons Why," the popular Netflix series adapted from the book of the same name. The first season has been attributed to at least one teen's suicide and AFA asked Netflix to cancel the second season or risk more suicides. 

In the National Center's fight with Roku, meanwhile, Hawkins says the company is not even hiding its affiliation with hardcore porn. In fact, she says, the porn industry advertises the accessibility via Roku.

National Center helps parents protect their children from objectionable content so it has a step-by-step guide to help parents block content. But there is one streaming service without parental controls – Roku.

Despite a lack of parental controls, parents can use a code on Roku that must be entered to add new channels according to National Center.


Editor's Note: The American Family Association is the parent organization of the American Family News Network, which operates OneNewsNow.com. 

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