SCOTUS: Draft push not for us to decide

Tuesday, June 8, 2021
 | 
Chad Groening (OneNewsNow.com)

female airman (USAF)A military watchdog that has fought the left-wing push to put women in military combat was pleased to watch the U.S. Supreme Court turn away an appeal to address the issue of a military draft.

On Monday, a three-judge panel at the high court ruled that it is up to Congress, not the courts, to decide whether to change the current military draft system that requires men --- and only men --- to register. 

Males are required to sign up at age 18 under the Military Selective Service Act.

In a joint statement that included Justice Stephen Breyer and Justice Brett Kavanaugh, Justice Sonia Sotomayor wrote on behalf of all three that the Court’s “longstanding deference to Congress, on matters of national defense and military affairs, cautions against granting review while Congress actively weighs the issue."

Elaine Donnelly, president of the Center for Military Readiness, says she was pleased the high court ruled against a petition because that volatile issue belongs in Congress. 

“We hope that Congress will take a responsible approach to this, look at all the facts,” Donnelly says, “and not be fooled by some of the arguments that were raised in this case by the plaintiffs and by the amicus briefs in support of what they were saying."  

Center for Military Readiness filed an amicus brief before the court. 

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