It's unanimous: 'Temporary' means exactly that – temporary

Tuesday, June 8, 2021
 | 
Chad Groening (OneNewsNow.com)

gavel with SCOTUS in backgroundAn immigration reform organization is pleased the U.S. Supreme Court has unanimously ruled that illegal aliens with Temporary Protected Status aren't eligible for "green cards."

It is rare that the high court issues 9-0 decisions – but on Monday, it was announced the justices all agreed that thousands of people who entered the country illegally, but have been allowed to stay for humanitarian reasons, are ineligible to apply to become permanent residents.

Writing for the court, Associate Justice Elena Kagan stated: "The TPS program gives foreign nationals nonimmigrant status, but it does not admit them. So the conferral of TPS does not make an unlawful entrant … eligible [for a green card]."

A green card – also known as a "Permanent Resident Card" or "alien registration card" – is issued by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services to foreign nationals as evidence of their lawful permanent resident status in the United States. Most are valid for ten years, after which they must be renewed or replaced.

Ira Mehlman, a spokesman for the Federation for American Immigration Reform, applauds the high court's ruling.

Mehlman

"They decided that 'temporary' actually means temporary – and [that] when you accept our temporary protection, we expect that you are going to abide by it," he explains. "And then if you want to get a green card, you need to return home and apply to come to the United States as a legal immigrant."

Mehlman admits he's encouraged by the 9-0 ruling. "It certainly does bode well for decisions that will come down about whether people who violate our immigration laws should be allowed to benefit from them," he offers.

"So all nine justices deserve credit for understanding the definition of a simple word – 'temporary' … which apparently a lot of other people can't quite grasp …."

The Associated Press reports that the TPS designation applies to people who come from countries ravaged by war or disaster. It protects them from deportation and allows them to work legally in the country. There are an estimated 400,000 people from 12 countries with TPS status.

Monday's ruling stemmed from a case involving a couple from El Salvador who have been in the U.S. since the early 1990s.

Comments

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWS BRIEF

FEATURED PODCAST

VOTE IN OUR POLL

Which high-profile GOP senator would you choose to replace Mitch McConnell?

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

  Claudette regains tropical storm strength after 13 deaths
  American taxpayers paying billions owed by California renters
Fear shakes Mexico border city after violence leaves 18 dead
Israeli PM: World powers must ‘wake up’ on Iran nuke deal
  Tokyo Olympics to allow limit of 10,000 local fans in venues

LATEST FROM THE WEB

Black theologian sounds warning, savages 'demonic' ideologies behind CRT, BLM, antiracism
A kid with the right attitude takes on her school board’s BLM hypocrisy
Following the scientists who were destroying America just to spite Trump
Arizona Gov. Ducey issues sweeping order protecting college students against COVID mandates
Slave stories history 'forgot': black people owned slaves too

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day
NEXT STORY
Judge dismisses MLB case… Now what?

MLB logo"The voice of Main Street" plans to hold a press conference today to announce its next steps in a lawsuit against Major League Baseball (MLB).