Christian students need to stand up 'before it's too late'

Monday, June 7, 2021
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

Keep locker rooms safe signA student is speaking out against the Biden administration's push for colleges to allow people to use facilities designated for the opposite-sex.

"As a female Christian student, I would certainly not feel comfortable sharing a bathroom or a dorm with a biological male, so I can only imagine what the students at the College of the Ozarks and other Christian colleges across the nation are feeling," says Campus Reform reporter and public university student Ophelie Jacobson.

The College of the Ozarks is in a legal battle with the federal government saying the directive forces religious schools to violate their beliefs by opening their dormitories and shared shower spaces to members of the opposite sex.

"Not only does this go against my personal level of comfort, it goes against my religious beliefs, and that is an area of my life that I believe the government has no right to interfere with," says Jacobson. "Unfortunately, we are going to see more cases like this one, and Christian colleges are facing increasing pressure to give up their moral values and beliefs to conform to the Biden administration's woke agenda."

Jacobson

To coincide with Pride Month, the U.S. Department of Education has released a resources page for LGBTQ students, telling them that federal law requires schools to ensure that LGBTQ students and other students have equal access to all aspects of a school's programs and activities, including bathrooms and dorms.

"There's also going to be a public hearing June 7th through the 11th where students can testify and share their stories of discrimination at higher education institutions," says Jacobson. "If any students are facing discrimination right now, it's Christian students on college campuses."

And the Campus Reform reporter asserts that it is not confined to secular campuses; Christian colleges are affected as well.

"Our religious views are not being welcomed by the Biden administration," Jacobson laments. "We're being treated unfairly because of it, and that's absolutely a reason to speak out and stand up for our religious beliefs before it's too late."

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