Court says it's 'moot' – girls say it matters

Thursday, April 29, 2021
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

trans issue in women's sports (track)Even though a federal court has dismissed a high-profile case, the battle over biological males competing in women's sports continues in Connecticut.

On Sunday afternoon, the federal district court in the state of Connecticut issued a ruling essentially barring the door to female athletes who are trying to protect fairness in their sport. One News Now spoke with attorney Christiana Holcomb of Alliance Defending Freedom, the law firm representing Selina Soule, Chelsea Mitchell, Alanna Smith, and Ashley Nicoletti.

"The court dismissed the case as moot, essentially ignoring all of the harms that these girls have endured," Holcomb shares. "[They're] losing out on championship titles, missing out on opportunities to advance to the next level of competition and compete for college scholarships."

Holcomb

The case is being appealed to the Second U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

"It will not take place quickly, which is unfortunate because two of our clients are still in high school," Holcomb continues. "Both Alanna and Ashley still have a couple seasons off their high school career left in front of them – and we want to protect their opportunities and ensure that they can compete fairly and know that when they step up to the starting line that their race will be fair."

Speaking of fairness, Holcomb says each of the girls has experienced some degree of backlash, primarily through social media.

"[They're hearing from] people that they don't know who disagree with their position on fairness in women's sports, but the vast majority of the response has been very positive," adds Holcomb.

"The girls have received so much support not just from family members and members of their community and track team, but from women across the country and across the world as well as they look at Selina, Chelsea, Alanna, and Ashley and really see them as the second set of Title IX pioneers as they are trying to again restore fair play for female athletes."

According to the attorney, one important aspect to recognize with the Connecticut policy is that it requires nothing more than simple identification on the part of the male athlete.

"One of the two male athletes who competed in girls' sports in Connecticut competed for three seasons as a male, turned around and just two weeks later began to compete in and to dominate in the girls' category," says Holcomb. "This can come up very, very quickly – and that's the reason we need a policy fix now."

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