Attorney: Public has right to see what undercover journalists see

Thursday, April 15, 2021
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

First Amendment Monument (Philadelphia)A legal group is appealing a decision against undercover journalist David Daleiden, whose prior video releases exposed the role of Planned Parenthood and others in the abortion industry in the sale of aborted babies' body parts.

Thomas More Society attorneys appealed the decision issued in federal court on April 7, 2021, granting the National Abortion Federation summary judgment and a permanent injunction in their lawsuit against Daleiden. U.S. District Judge William H. Orrick III handed down an order that declared Daleiden in breach of contract with the abortion provider association for filming at the group's national conferences. Orrick also imposed a permanent injunction against Daleiden, preventing him from ever releasing hundreds of hours of his videos taken at those conferences.

Attorney Peter Breen with Thomas More Society spoke with One News Now.

"America cannot survive if undercover journalists are not allowed to operate," the attorney begins. "Put aside any private interests – the public interest requires that the people of this country be able to see the video of the abortion tradeshows that David Daleiden took."

Breen

Breen adds that the First Amendment guarantees not just Daleiden's right to speak, but the right of the American people to hear his message and to see this video.

"I can't tell you what's on these videos other than to let you know it's some shocking stuff, some of it in the same vein as some of the earlier Center for Medical Progress videos but obviously different conversations, different people," Breen continues.

"Some of it is new and would turn your stomach and presumably would cause policy makers and others to pursue different policies in relation to abortion, in relation to human dignity, in relation to the trafficking of children's body parts."

Breen urges journalists in every part of the U.S. to pay attention to and care about this case.

"The lawsuit brought against David could be brought against any pro-lifer anywhere in the country and could be brought against any undercover journalist on any topic you care about, from animal rights to corrupt politicians or otherwise," Breen explains.

"They could be taken to court and injunctions placed on them; attempts [could be] made to bankrupt them in the same way that it's been done to David. So, this is not just about abortion, it's not just about David Daleiden – it's about the whole country and our Constitution."

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