High court issues 'strong strike' against Roe v. Wade

Wednesday, March 31, 2021
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

KY Gov Andy BeshearA pro-life advocate is viewing a recent Supreme Court announcement as a small but forward step.

The high court on Monday agreed to hear an appeal from Attorney General Daniel Cameron (R-Kentucky), who wants to be allowed to defend a restriction on abortion rights that has been struck down by lower courts.

Kent Ostrander, executive director of The Family Foundation of Kentucky, is pleased with the development.

"We had a strong pro-life governor in Governor Matt Bevin (R-Kentucky), and the attorney general at that time, a Democrat, is now Governor Andy Beshear," Ostrander explains. "When Bevin tried to protect the pro-life bills when they were taken to court, he had to use his own executive branch attorneys because the attorney general would not protect them. And now that that Democrat attorney general is now our governor, he basically was hanging out all of Bevin's legislation to dry because he would not defend it."

Ostrander, Kent (Family Foundation of KY)Attorney General Cameron petitioned the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals to get permission to intervene. When that court said no, Cameron took it to the U.S. Supreme Court.

"The Supreme Court is simply saying, 'We'll hear this man's concern and see if he does have standing,'" Ostrander continues. "So it's a small step, but it's a small step forward, and we can rejoice in that."

The abortion restriction in question bars the dismemberment of preborn children.

"That, of course, is how most late-term abortions are done, and so it's a strong strike against Roe v Wade and the abortion on-demand mentality," adds Ostrander. "We think it's inhumane to tear apart an unborn human being without any kind of anesthesia, and that's what this bill says."

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