Immigration laws must be enforced, rules SCOTUS

Monday, March 8, 2021
 | 
Chad Groening (OneNewsNow.com)

ICE arrest (new pic)An immigration enforcement advocacy organization is praising a Supreme Court ruling that will make it harder for illegal aliens who have been convicted of a crime to avoid deportation.

Justice Neil Gorsuch wrote the opinion for a 5-3 conservative majority that ruled against an illegal alien from Mexico who has lived in the U.S. for 25 years. Clemente Avelino Pereida had been charged in Nebraska with using a fraudulent Social Security card to get a job and was convicted under a state law against criminal impersonation.

Before this ruling, illegal aliens with criminal convictions who were facing deportation could ask the attorney general to allow them to remain in the country if the conviction was not for a serious crime and if the person had lived in America at least 10 years, among other criteria. But in this case, Gorsuch wrote that Pereida failed to prove that he was not convicted of a serious crime.

Mehlman

Ira Mehlman, a spokesman for the Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR), says this will make it all the more difficult for the Biden administration to keep the president's promise of suspending all deportations.

"Essentially what the court said is that you cannot simply decide to make an across-the-board decision not to enforce any of the nation's immigration laws," Mehlman summarizes. "Whether the president in the Oval Office likes them or not, he or she is obligated to carry them out."

And Mehlman believes this ruling will discourage future legal challenges to immigration statutes that are already on the books. 

"The administration obviously is going to push the envelope as far as it can," the FAIR spokesman expects. "We saw during the Trump administration the advocates for illegal aliens were at the courthouse door the moment that administration did anything that they didn't like, so turnabout is fair play."

In this case, the law is on the side of those who oppose any effort to "take a wrecking ball to our immigration policy enforcement."

Justice Amy Coney Barrett did not take part in the case because she had not yet joined the court when the case was argued in October.

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