A chance to end 'a whole bunch of the shenanigans'

Friday, February 19, 2021
 | 
Chad Groening (OneNewsNow.com)

voter getting 'I Voted' stickerThe Supreme Court will decide today whether it will hear any lawsuits challenging the validity of the 2020 presidential election.

The Supreme Court refused to intervene in any of the lawsuits filed before January 20 that the plaintiffs believe could have proven election fraud and potentially changed the outcome of the 2020 presidential election. But Friday, almost a month after the inauguration, the high court will meet to decide if it will take up those election lawsuits, even though they would not likely be heard until October.

Gramley, Diane (AFA of Pennsylvania)The case that perhaps has the best chance of Supreme Court review is the lawsuit brought by Pennsylvania Congressman Mike Kelly (R), which challenges the constitutionality of the state's election law changes that were not approved by the state legislature.

"There are a lot of people here in Pennsylvania, Republicans especially, who have said their vote did not count on November 3, and they're just disgusted with the whole process," accounts Diane Gramley, president of the American Family Association of Pennsylvania. "Some even have said they would never vote again because it doesn't matter; their vote doesn't count. This should have all been dealt with prior to the election. And unless this is dealt with, we're in big trouble as a representative republic."

Zawistowski

During a recent podcast, Tom Zawistowski of the tea party-affiliated We the People Convention shared his belief that the Supreme Court will take the Pennsylvania case.

"It's so clearly a constitutional violation," he submits. "That's important for us because we can't move forward unless we fix the voter fraud."

If the Supreme Court will rule that only the legislature can make the rules, Zawistowski says that will end "a whole bunch of the shenanigans that took place." If the justices do not take the case, however, he warns that "we're in a world of trouble."

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