In effect, the unborn themselves are suing the state

Tuesday, February 16, 2021
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

pregnant African-American womanA class-action lawsuit in Alabama seeks to declare that pre-born African-American children are persons under the law.

"Baby Q is bringing a class-action lawsuit on behalf of all other pre-born African-American babies in Alabama," says attorney Sam McLure, who is involved with the case. "They are being disparately impacted through abortion."

For example, McLure says even though African Americans make up 27% of the population in Alabama, they comprise 60% of the aborted children in the state.

McLure

"So, they're three times more likely to lose their lives through abortion," he continues. "We're asking the courts to order the governor and attorney general to do something about that by enforcing Alabama pro-life law."

McLure, founder of the Alabama-based Adoption Law Firm, points to the recently passed Amendment 930 as one such pro-life law.

"Our amendment incorporates the values of protecting life," explains McLure. "In 2019, the legislature passed the Human Life Protection Act, which is one of the most aggressive abolition of abortion bills in the country, [but unfortunately] those bills have not saved one baby."

McLure's lawsuit, which also includes state legislators, names Governor Kay Ivey (R-Alabama), Attorney General Steve Marshall (R-Alabama), and abortion clinics as co-defendants.

"The governor and all the abortion clinics are asking the court to dismiss this lawsuit," McLure tells One News Now. "They are opposing the state legislators intervening in the case, and our opportunity to respond to that opposition will be on March 12."

Baby Q, et al. v. Gov. Kay Ivey and AG Marshall, et al. was filed in Montgomery County Circuit Court. According to The Adoption Law Firm, the lawsuit calls on the court to answer three questions:

  1. Are African-American children persons?

  2. Are they disparately affected by abortion?

  3. What is the state of Alabama going to do about it?

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