'One-size-fits-all' executive order doesn't always work

Tuesday, September 15, 2020
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

gavel with Bible 1A church in Maine is awaiting a decision on its lawsuit against the governor.

Attorneys for Calvary Chapel of Bangor recently made arguments before the First Circuit Court of Appeals over what the church calls Governor Janet Mills' (D) unconstitutional COVID-19 orders against churches.

Liberty Counsel Founder Mat Staver explains that when this case was filed, there was no worship allowed, either in person or in the parking lot, yet a lot of other things were exempted.

"This particular ministry … has a substance abuse program that's a residential one-year program for men and women housed right there on the church property," Staver reports. "These individuals, as part of their rehabilitation and help, come to the church on a regular, daily basis for Bible study, prayer, fellowship, teaching, and other kinds of encouragement and support."

That is allowed, but religious meetings are not.

Staver

"It really put this particular pastor in a quandary," Staver continues. "This is really part of the problem that we see happening on a global scale, particularly across every state in the country with regards to these one-size-fits-all executive order templates, as they do not work for every particular situation."

Earlier this year, U.S. District Judge Nancy Torresen found that prohibiting in-person worship services was in the best interest of the public due to the coronavirus pandemic.

"The State is managing an extraordinary array of issues, and it has responded to the challenges raised by COVID-19 by establishing uniform standards and restrictions based on evolving scientific evidence," Torresen said in a 23-page ruling issued in May. "Upsetting the careful balance being drawn by Maine's governor at this time would have an adverse effect on the public interest."

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