Attorney: State 'targeting' pastor, church following in-person services

Thursday, August 13, 2020
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

gavel with Bible 1In the wake of his church's "peaceful protest" on Sunday, Pastor John MacArthur's attorneys are saying it's clear the state is out to get him.

Attorneys for Pastor MacArthur have filed suit against the State of California. The lawsuit is filed in the Superior Court of the State of California County of Los Angeles, and comes amid orders against indoor worship services. Three Democratic leaders – Governor Gavin Newsom, Attorney General Xavier Becerra, and Mayor Eric Garcetti – are named in the lawsuit, as are several California and Los Angeles County public health officials.

Attorney Jenna Ellis of Thomas More Society is with the law firm representing Pastor MacArthur and Grace Community Church.

Ellis

"The lawsuit seeks to prohibit California from enforcing its unconstitutional pandemic regulations against Grace Community Church – and we're also seeking a judgment that the health orders violate the California constitution," Ellis explains.

On July 29, 2020, the County of Los Angeles sent Pastor MacArthur a demand letter telling him not to have in-person worship services. This, after MacArthur and the church resumed indoor services following weeks of doing everything online and with no one in the sanctuary.

MacArthur continued to hold services even after the letter. This Sunday (August 9), Pastor MacArthur welcomed worshippers to "the Grace Community Church peaceful protest." He was met with a standing ovation and extended applause from the congregation.

MacArthur

According to Ellis, the county has counter-sued MacArthur and his church.

"About six hours after we filed this lawsuit, Los Angeles County filed their own lawsuit against Pastor MacArthur and Grace Community Church seeking a restraining order to essentially close the church from further activity during this lawsuit and until they decide to release the restrictions," the attorney tells OneNewsNow.

"So, they are completely targeting him. They're going after him and the church – and we're hoping that a judge will see how onerous, how unconstitutional these restrictions are."

Ellis adds there is a political preference to this issue.

"LA County allowed riots and political protests in the name of George Floyd, in the name of other political ideology," she explains. "They didn't seek in any way to shut those things down, and yet they are clearly targeting a church which enjoys the protections of the California state constitution as well as the federal Constitution."

Attorneys for Pastor MacArthur and the other parties mentioned in the lawsuit could be in court as early as tomorrow (Friday, August 14, 2020).

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