Need for 'proper justices' seen in recent SCOTUS decision

Wednesday, July 29, 2020
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

Chief Justice John RobertsA situation involving the Supreme Court and a Nevada church has one attorney thinking this is all the more reason to vote in November.

Last Friday, the U.S. Supreme Court denied the emergency request for an injunction pending appeal regarding an application filed by a church near Reno. Calvary Chapel Dayton Valley was asking to be "subjected to the same COVID-19 restrictions in Nevada that allow casinos, restaurants and other businesses to operate at 50 percent of capacity with proper social distancing."

The Supreme Court's rejection of the emergency request followed a 5-4 vote by justices. Chief Justice John Roberts (pictured) – an appointee of former President George W. Bush – sided with the liberal majority in denying the request.

"This goes to show how important it is for the proper justices to be appointed to the Supreme Court," says attorney Brad Dacus of Pacific Justice Institute.

Dacus

"We have one, two, maybe three openings in the next one to four years," he continues, "and it's very crucial that people realize that their vote this November will have a major impact on whether or not churches … and synagogues will be allowed to be treated like second-class citizens and not given the same equal rights and protection to be able to meet and worship as those wishing to play slot machines."

Among the justices voting in the minority was Justice Neil Gorsuch, a Trump appointee.

"I think Justice Gorsuch stated it very well when he [wrote] 'there is no world in which the Constitution permits Nevada to favor Caesar's Palace over Calvary Chapel,'" Dacus continues.

In a strongly worded dissent, Justice Samuel Alito wrote: "That Nevada would discriminate in favor of the powerful gaming industry and its employees may not come as a surprise, but this Court's willingness to allow such discrimination is disappointing."

Alito added: "The Constitution guarantees the free exercise of religion. It says nothing about freedom to play craps or blackjack, to feed tokens into a slot machine or to engage in any other game of chance."

Dacus describes the high court's ruling as "a clear ignoring of the fundamental rights of churches to, at the very least, have the same equal treatment and equal protection under the law as the likes of casinos."

Comments

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

FEATURED PODCAST

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWSBRIEF

SUBSCRIBE

VOTE IN OUR POLL

Do you depend on the network news to keep up with events of the day?

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

5.1-magnitude quake hits North Carolina, causes minor damage
World donors demand change before money to rebuild Beirut
DC shooting leaves 1 dead, some 20 injured
Postal Service emerges as flash point heading into election
Body removed months after hotel collapsed under construction

LATEST FROM THE WEB

The myth that lockdowns stop pandemics
The costs kids will pay for fall school closure
Lockdowns never again: Sweden was right, and we were wrong
Political correctness in space: NASA to remove offensive names from planets and other heavenly bodies
Rep. Walker calls for Falwell's resignation from Liberty University

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day
NEXT STORY
When a state agency 'goes rogue,' this can happen

hand knocking on a doorAfter having charges dropped against them, a Texas family still has its name on a child abuse registry.