Judges block pro-life measures from taking effect in 2 states

Tuesday, July 14, 2020
 | 
Charlie Butts (OneNewsNow.com)

gavel Planned ParenthoodIt didn't take long for the abortion industry to demonstrate just how upset it is with Tennessee and Georgia.

As reported on Monday, two federal judges have used their power to stop pro-life laws in those two states. U.S. District Judge Campbell in Nashville waited until Tennessee Governor Bill Lee (R) signed a bill into law before granting a temporary restraining order on what the pro-life group Susan B. Anthony List considers to be the most sweeping pro-life bill in the nation.

"It includes limits on abortion as early as a child's heartbeat can be detected," explains SBA List spokesperson Prudence Robertson. "And [it] also includes bans on abortion based on discrimination due to sex, race, or a diagnosis of Down syndrome; and it stops late-term abortions after five months of pregnancy when babies can feel pain."

As soon as the ink dried, the usual suspects filed suit – and Judge Campbell immediately blocked the bill from going into effect until a July 27 hearing.

"We're not surprised that pro-abortion groups like Planned Parenthood and the ACLU are going to fight laws like this," Robertson tells OneNewsNow. "They've done it before with legislation similar to the Tennessee law in Missouri, Ohio, and other states. The abortion lobby won't stop until abortion is completely accessible everywhere."

In Georgia on Monday, a federal judge permanently blocked Georgia's heartbeat abortion law that bans abortion if a child's heartbeat can be detected. In a case brought by abortion providers and an advocacy group, U.S. District Judge Steve Jones ruled that Georgia's HB 481 violates the U.S. Constitution to prohibit terminating the baby at that point.

"[This legislation] violates the constitutional right to privacy which, in turn, inflicts per se irreparable harm on plaintiffs," Jones wrote in his order.

HB 481 was temporarily blocked last October before going into effect.

Campbell was appointed by President Donald Trump; Jones was appointed by former President Barack Obama.

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