The beat goes on in Daleiden case

Tuesday, May 5, 2020
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

gavel Planned ParenthoodThe legal fight continues for the man who produced the videos exposing Planned Parenthood's sordid dealings.

In David Daleiden's criminal case, Thomas More Society just filed an appeal of the superior court judge's decision where he found Daleiden could be charged with the ten remaining felony counts.

"We want to challenge that through the California appeals system where it starts with another superior court judge, and then we would go up to the court of appeals and, if necessary, the Supreme Court of California," reports Thomas More Society attorney Peter Breen.

He says attorneys have "some really strong theories" and, as a result, are optimistic about getting charges thrown out during the appeals process.

"Barring that, we then go to a jury trial in front of a San Francisco jury on any of these remaining felony counts," Breen continues. "We started with 15 [counts]; we're down to ten, and with a potential penalty of a decade in San Quentin penitentiary if we're unsuccessful."

Meanwhile, in the civil cases for David Daleiden, attorneys are now looking at post-trial motions to challenge (a) the $2.3 million verdict against Daleiden and (b) a permanent injunction that was entered by the district court judge to forbid Daleiden from ever doing undercover work against Planned Parenthood again.

Breen

"The legal theories that Planned Parenthood employed in the case against David Daleiden could be used by any entity or politician or person against an undercover journalist who was exposing wrongdoing, whether it be corrupt politicians, whether it is those who are abusing animals -- anything," Breen warns. "They can use these same legal theories against undercover journalists."

Daleiden and his colleagues were charged with misrepresenting who they were and not telling Planned Parenthood that they were taping as they went into the Planned Parenthood conferences and lunch meetings and such.

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