It's business as usual for Ohio's abortuaries … for now

Tuesday, April 7, 2020
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

Judge banging gavel 2Following a decision by the Sixth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, elective abortions are being permitted in Ohio.

The Sixth Circuit on Monday declined an appeal by Attorney General Dave Yost (R-Ohio) to reverse a temporary restraining order issued by Judge Michael Barrett. Judge Barrett's order allowed abortion facilities in Ohio to continue performing surgical abortions despite an order by the Ohio Department of Health that all non-essential surgical procedures cease in light of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Yost had asked the appeals court to overturn Judge Barrett's order, arguing that non-essential abortions should cease in order to preserve personal protective equipment.

Stephanie Krider of Ohio Right to Life says her organization is grateful to Attorney General Yost for his effort and leadership.

Krider

"These are elective abortions that we are talking about," the pro-life group's vice president tells OneNewsNow. "These are not life-saving treatments for anybody."

While elective abortions are being allowed in the Buckeye State, Krider still sees reasons to be optimistic about the pro-life movement in the state.

"We are so fortunate to have so many pro-life elected office holders," she explains. "We have a pro-life administration in the governor's office, we have a pro-life attorney general.

"[Ohio Right to Life] will not ease up and let this issue go away," Krider concludes. "And I don't believe that our attorney general will either [because] he is committed to ensuring that abortion clinics are going to follow the law and they're going to do the right thing and conserve surgical equipment and do the things that everyone else in Ohio is trying to do to limit the spread of this disease."

She also issues a cautionary note to the abortion industry, telling them they shouldn't interpret this latest ruling as "a loophole to continue ending innocent lives, push abortion on demand, and proceed with business as usual."

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