Pensacola cross will stand … for now

Friday, February 21, 2020
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

Pensacola crossA battle may have ended over a cross in Pensacola, but the war is far from over.

The Bayview Park Cross, as it's known, is located on public property in Pensacola. The American Humanist Association and Freedom From Religion Foundation (FFRF) didn't like that, saying it violates the Establishment Clause of the Constitution. A three-judge panel of the 11th Circuit disagreed with that argument this week. (See earlier story)

Still, as the Pensacola News Journal points out, the case could be appealed to a full panel of all 11th Circuit Court judges or to the U.S. Supreme Court. It's already been the high court once, but was sent back to the 11th Circuit after the Supreme Court ruled in favor of a cross-shaped memorial on public property in Maryland.

Katherine Johnson, research fellow for legal and policy studies for the Family Research Council, describes the lawsuit as "very clearly an attack on any sort of a symbol of faith."

Johnson

"And what was most shocking to me was actually two of the plaintiffs in this 11th Circuit case live in Canada," she added during a discussion on the Washington Watch with Tony Perkins radio program. "It's clear that they're just trying to erase any sort of symbolism of Christianity or religion from the public sphere."

Pensacola Mayor Grover Robinson told the Pensacola News Journal that he was happy with Wednesday's ruling and views the cross in its historical context, not necessarily just as a religious symbol.

"It's been there for a long time in relation to recognize those who served in our military and given their lives," Robinson told the newspaper. "So again, very happy to see that it will still be a part of our community into the future as it has been in the past."

The Bayview Park cross was erected in 1941 by the Jaycees, as the U.S. prepared to enter WWII. The city has been represented by Becket in the case.

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